Monthly Archives: February 2011

Madison in Winter


Written by: Eric Rickstad

Winter fishing around southwest Montana is as much about shaking some cabin fever as anything else. Seems like the weather is either warm and windy or bitter cold and windy. So, when we get a day without the wind—be it bitter or warm—a few hours on the water always sounds good to me.

The lower Madison is typically a great winter fishing choice as it offers lots of easy. . .

Read More  »

The Orvis Fly Fishing Guide Podcast- Sight Fishing for Stripers


Written by: Eric Rickstad

In this podcast, I give 15 tips on sight fishing for stripers as requested on our new podcast voicemail line. We also get a call from Iceland with a correction to my last podcast.

Did I leave anything out? Have a sugestion for a future podcast? Call me at (802) 362-8800 or leave us a comment by clicking the READ MORE button.

Click the play button below to listen to this episode. Go to orvis.com/podcast to subscribe to future episodes


If you cannot see the podcast player, please click this link to listen.

Read More  »

Happy Presidents’ Day!


Written by: Eric Rickstad

obama_fishing_east_gallatin

President Barack Obama reacts to missing a strike on the
East Gallatin with guide Dan Vermillion.

To celebrate the holiday, we focus on those Commanders-In-Chief who have cast a fly as a way to relax. First, we offer an account of past angling presidents, from Grover Cleveland to George Herbert Walker Bush. And here’s the story of our current President learning the hard way that fly fishing (like governing) can be both exhilarating and frustrating. For a more in-depth look at the history. . .

Read More  »

Friday Film Festival 02.18.11


Written by: Eric Rickstad

Film Festival2

Welcome to another edition of the OrvisNews.com Friday Film Fest, in which we scour the Internets for the best fly-fishing footage available. We’ve got a five videos to stoke your passion for fly fishing as we wait for spring to arrive. The weather has turned downright balmy up here in Vermont, so the thought of casting big streamers on Opening Day suddenly seems less remote, despite the foot of snow that remains on the ground. Click “Read More” to see this week’s films, and enjoy!

Read More  »

Interview with TU’s Tim Bristol


Written by: Eric Rickstad


As director of Trout Unlimited’s Alaska Program, Tim Bristol has been on the front lines of the fight against the proposed Pebble Mine.

photo courtesy Tim Bristol

In light of last week’s decision by the EPA to assess the potential impacts of large-scale development on the Bristol Bay watershed, I asked Trout Unlimited’s Alaska Program director, Tim Bristol (no relation to the bay of the same name), if he wouldn’t mind answering a few question.

1. Can you give us a brief overview of where the Pebble Project right now? What is the Pebble Partnership doing?

Pebble is claiming to still be in the pre-permitting phase; they have yet to file for permits. At the same time, they continue to give presentations on the the
tremendous size of the ore body, with recent estimates saying Pebble could generate up to 9 billion tons of waste rock. So, at this time, . . .

Read More  »

How Sandanona Saved Me


Written by: Phil Monahan

James Ross 1

Shooting instructor James Ross sights down the barrel with me to diagnose any problems with gun mount, follow through, or anything else that may cause me to miss the clay target.

photo by Sandy Hays

The final straw was my last shot of the 2010 Vermont grouse season. I’ve never been a good (or even mediocre) shot, but for the first time since I had moved back to the Northeast almost a decade earlier, I had gone the whole season without downing a single bird. I was determined to rectify the situation on that cold day before New Year’s Eve.

But after an hour of fruitless hunting, I was ready to give up and started walking back toward the car along a logging road. I remained alert, but hope was certainly waning as the last gate came into view. Suddenly, the whirring of wings bursting into flight sounded from a pine tree to my left, . . .

Read More  »

In the Loop 02.17.11


Written by: Eric Rickstad

Rainbow Phil

Biologists in Montana point to the mobility and adaptability of rainbow trout
as among the reasons populations did not crash the way many feared
when whirling diseasd was first discovered.

photo by Phil Monahan

When whirling disease was first discovered in the Madison River in 1994, many anglers feared that the end of the fishery was nigh. Fifteen years later, the Madison is still a wildly popular angling destination, and biologists believe that  the adaptability of rainbow trout allowed populations to survive the disease. An article in the Helena Independent Record details current thinking on the subject. A variety of factors—including the mobility of rainbows, which travel an average of 42.8 miles per year; their ability. . .

Read More  »

Thanks for protecting Bristol Bay


Written by: Eric Rickstad

Last week, we let you know about the EPA’s plans to assess the Bristol Bay watershed in order to understand how future large-scale development like the proposed Pebble Mine may affect its water quality and the bay’s salmon fishery.

We also asked you to give the EPA your input through our easy Take Action page.

Boy did you.

Approximately 6,000 of you sent nearly 23,000 emails to over 550 representatives in DC and to the EPA telling them to use their authority to protect Bristol Bay. We thank you for that.

If you did not get the chance last week, we encourage you to go to the Take Action page now to let the EPA know this resource is too important and rare to risk having the world’s largest open pit mine situated at its headwaters.

Read More  »

Tom Rosenbauer’s Trivia Challenge


Written by: Eric Rickstad

With our last Trivia Challenge, I was asked to step it up a bit as many of you thought the “challenge” was a bit lacking. So, this week I’ve stepped it up with what I think are more difficult (and interesting) questions, and perhaps more fun for it. As another user requested, I also give the reasons behind the correct answers.



Read More  »