The Best Dog Breeds for Swimming

Portuguese Water Dogs. Irish Water Spaniels. Chesapeake Bay Retrievers. These dog breeds are all excellent swimmers, but having ‘water’ or a body of water referenced in your dog’s name isn’t a prerequisite for water-loving dogs. Many dog breeds and rescue dogs enjoy splashing around and swimming. And some adore the water so much they seem part amphibian.

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The Six Best Dog Breeds for First-Time Owners


Photo via orvis.com

The best dog breed for first-time dog owners is the Labrador Retriever. Labs are laid-back, joyful companions, and relatively easy to train, making them an ideal breed for beginners. Rounding out the best six breeds for first-timers are Golden Retrievers, Redbone Coonhounds, Bernese Mountain Dogs, Collies, and Soft-Coated Wheaten Terriers.

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Should My Dog Have Water in Her Crate?

Ready access to water is as essential for keeping dogs hydrated as it is for people. But crating your dog complicates things. A water bowl inside a crate can spill and leave your dog uncomfortable—in what should be her cozy, inviting den. During housetraining, the ramifications are even worse.

So, how can you crate your dog and keep her hydrated?

Your priority is always giving your dog easy access to fresh water. Keeping that goal top of mind, you can wisely determine whether to crate her without water, how long you can leave her crated without water, and the instances where water in the dog crate is a good idea.

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Common Hazards for Dogs Around the House

What do dish detergent, raisins, chocolate, and mothballs have in common? They’re all hazardous for dogs—and they exist in many households. Of the many responsibilities that come with owning a dog, protecting him from dangerous foods, cleaning supplies, and other toxins should be a priority. To keep your dog safe, know where the household toxins are stored, and take steps to keep these hazards out of your dog’s paw and jaw reach.

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Guys and Dolls: How to Match the Hendrickson Hatch(es)

Written by: Ted Fauceglia


The female dun is lighter and larger than the male, and the trout will often key on one or the other.
All photos by Ted Fauceglia

For the ardent dry-fly angler, the advent of the spring trout-fishing season stirs feelings of anticipation like nothing else. Sure, dredging weighted stonefly nymphs and Woolly Buggers through winter’s . . .

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5 Tips for Fishing During Runoff

Written by: Doc Thompson


Smaller tailwaters, like the Cimarron, often handle runoff better than large freestone rivers.
Photos by Doc Thompson

It is that time of year when spring runoff is starting in the West. A lot of folks consider this to be a slow to non-fishing time of year. However, early and late stages of runoff offer conditions that. . .

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Pro Tips: Top 10 Flies for Stillwater Trout

Written by: Drew Rodden, North Park Anglers


Drew Rodden shows off a gorgeous stillwater rainbow from Colorado.
Photo courtesy Drew Rodden

I grew up fishing with conventional tackle for warmwater species around Missouri. But spending my Saturday mornings watching fishing shows on TV, I began to take an interest in fly. . .

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