What Size Crate Should I Get for My Dog?


Photo via orvis.com

A dog crate should be big enough for your dog to comfortably rest and turn around in, but not too big, as a crate that’s too large can interfere with housebreaking training. Most dog crates are sized by the dog’s weight, so you’ll need to know your own dog’s weight before deciding on a crate size. In general, small or toy dogs should use a small crate, while the largest dogs like Newfoundlands should use an extra-large crate. However, most dogs will fall in between these extreme sizes, so it’s best to use the following chart to choose your dog crate sizing:

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How to Leash Train Your Dog

Leash training does not have to look only one particular way or involve only one piece of training equipment. This post will answer some common questions and describe some techniques and equipment that have worked for many, many people and dogs—give them a try!

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Dog Collars vs Harnesses

A harness is often a better choice than a collar.
Photo via orvis.com

Generally, unless your dog is a puller, a collar will be better than harnesses for most dogs. But whether a harness or collar is the best choice for your dog really depends on her age, breed, and walking style. For rambunctious, active, and younger dogs, a harness can facilitate training and give you more control and can do so with ease and minimal exertion on your part. For older, well-trained dogs, a collar with a leash does the trick. Sometimes, you’ll want both on hand depending on where you’re headed on your adventures. 

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Creating a Dog Drool-Protected Home


Photo by: Kathryn, Smithfield

 

Owning a dog makes life a good measure happier—and messier. Constant fur to vacuum, muddy paws to manage, and full-body fur shakes after rainy walks. But the slimiest canine mess is the dreaded dog drool puddle. Your dog puts your devotion to the test when you sit on a drool-soaked couch cushion or slide across the hardwood floor on a patch of slobber. The good news is, even if your best friend is a copious drooler, it’s possible to keep the mess to a minimum. Here’s a primer on all things dog drool, how to protect your home from unwelcome goo, and which dog breeds drool the most—and least.

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Dog Collars: Buckles vs. Clips

Whether they close with a clip or a buckle, dog collars have two main functions: to keep the two of you together, and to provide ID information that can help reunite you if you become separated…all in a way that is safe for your dog. 

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How to Clean a Dog Collar

Dogs love mud, and they end up soiling their collars, as well as themselves.
Photo by Jody, Stevenson

No matter how clean your dog stays or how fresh his coat, the collar he wears will eventually absorb enough skin oils, dirt, and grime to develop an odor. Dogs who spend a lot of time outdoors rolling in the mud, swimming in lakes and streams, chasing balls, or playing at the dog park are more prone to collar funk than the small lap dog who rarely ventures out and takes a weekly trip to the doggie salon. But eventually, all collars will need to be washed to keep them smelling nice—and to prevent unhygienic bacteria buildup.

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Classic Pro Tips: How to Tie More Efficiently

Fly-tying is a life long adventure that I hope is a source of relaxation and renewal for those that pursue it. The tips in this video are not meant to rush you through the process of creating. . .

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Top 5 Fly-Casting Mistakes and How to Correct Them

Written by: Zach Matthews


Knowing how to cast is important, but so is knowing when to stop casting and start fishing.
Photo by Sandy Hays

Fly-casting is not easy. Like any skill worth knowing, casting expertise takes a long time to develop—in some cases years. The good news is that anglers pretty much make the same mistakes, and . . .

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