Pro Tips: How to Set-Up Rigs for Nymphs, Streamers, and Dry-Droppers

Written by: Luke Lowery


If your nymph isn’t at the right depth, the fish won’t eat it.
Photo by Sandy Hays

With the nice weather we’ve been having in Montana, anglers are flocking to the Madison. The most common questions I get in the shop are about how to set up a rig properly. I will go. . .

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The American Grannom (Genus Brachycentrus ) Is a Springtime Gem

Written by: Ted Fauceglia


Larvae of Brachycentridae family are case-builders, creating chimney-shaped homes.
Photo by Ted Fauceglia

Unlike the mystical status that we fly fishers have ascribed to mayflies and their hatches, the caddisfly has received little of the same reverence. Classically speaking, the elegance of . . .

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5 Tips for Fishing During Runoff

Written by: Doc Thompson


Smaller tailwaters, like the Cimarron, often handle runoff better than large freestone rivers.
Photos by Doc Thompson

It is that time of year when spring runoff is starting in the West. A lot of folks consider this to be a slow to non-fishing time of year. However, early and late stages of runoff offer conditions that. . .

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Video Pro Tips: How to Mend Fly Line


By flipping the belly of your line upstream, you keep the current from dragging your line and, ultimately, your fly.

I remember the day the light bulb went off for me. I was standing shin deep in a small New Hampshire stream under the colorful fall foliage canopy while several brook trout rose in. . .

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Tightline-Nymphing Tips: When in Doubt, Drag ‘Em

Written by: George Daniel, Livin On The Fly


In fast-water stretches, it pays to err on the side of too much tension on your nymphs.
Photos by George Daniel

Nymphing without an indicator can be a challenge, especially when you’re fishing turbulent water where micro currents are moving in different directions. Some currents may be moving . . .

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Pet Adoption Statistics: The Numbers Behind the Need

Each year millions of companion animals enter shelters. Hundreds of thousands are currently in need of homes. Here’s the good news: pet overpopulation has slowed dramatically since the 1970s, when it’s estimated American animal shelters euthanized between 12 and 20 million cats and dogs every year. Compare that to today, when only three to four million animals must be euthanized annually. And here’s another telling fact: in the 1970s there were 67 million pets in American homes, and today there are more than 135 million. In other words, we invite far more animals into our families these days and euthanize far fewer, perhaps suggesting a paradigm shift in how we think about animal stewardship.

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Guest Post: Save a life. Adopt a dog.


Sadie’s comfort level in her new surroundings helped seal the deal for Dave.

Several weeks ago, my wife, Brandi, took our cat to the vet to get his annual checkup and shots. While at the office, she met a woman who was fostering a Silver Lab named Sadie. Brandi. . .

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Pro Tips: A Supplies Checklist for Your New Puppy


Puppyhood can be a magical time, but it’s a lot easier if you are prepared.
Photo by Robert, Monroe

For those of us who love dogs, there is almost nothing more exciting than adopting a new puppy. They are possibly the cutest creatures on the face of the earth. Those of you who have . . .

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The Benefits of Adopting a Senior Dog


Older dogs have a lot to offer.
Photo by Jane Sobel Klonsky, Project Unconditional

Adopting a senior or adult dog delivers as many joys as adopting a puppy—along with some unique benefits. But senior dogs are frequently bypassed for younger dogs in rescue shelters because of common misconceptions about them, according to the ASPCA. If you’re considering adopting a dog with some miles under his paws, read on for a closer look at older dog adoptions, the special considerations to keep in mind, and the steps to adopting an adult or senior dog.

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