Picture(s) of the Day: Huge Big Hole River Brown Trout

Big Hole Brown Trout 1

After spending the morning learning how to cast, Cheryl went out on the Big Hole
and slammed this monstrous brown trout on a dry fly.

photo by Wade Fellin

Wade Fellin, a fly-fishing guide at
Big Hole Lodge, sent us these great photos, along with an inspiring story of beginner’s luck:

Cheryl had been working hard on learning how to fly cast all morning. She had finally made her leader turn over consistently after lunch, when we saw an unassuming rise in an eddy. I rowed closer, and Cheryl made a perfect cast with a salmon fly imitation, executed a perfect mend, and BOOM!  She was soon landing this 24-inch Big Hole brown trout!

Click “Read More” to see more pictures.

Big Hole Brown Trout 1

After spending the morning learning how to cast, Cheryl went out on the Big Hole
and slammed this monstrous brown trout on a dry fly.

photo by Wade Fellin

Wade Fellin, a fly-fishing guide at
Big Hole Lodge, sent us these great photos, along with an inspiring story of beginner’s luck:

Cheryl had been working hard on learning how to fly cast all morning. She had finally made her leader turn over consistently after lunch, when we saw an unassuming rise in an eddy. I rowed closer, and Cheryl made a perfect cast with a salmon fly imitation, executed a perfect mend, and BOOM!  She was soon landing this 24-inch Big Hole brown trout!

Big Hole Brown Trout 1

A happy client, a happy guide, and a gorgeous brown trout.

photos by Wade Fellin

Tom Rosenbauer’s Tips for Fly Fishing the Spinner Fall

Returning mayfly spinners or egg-laying caddisfly adults can cause intense feeding by the trout, but this situation can be misleading. Because the spent insects are lying prostrate on the surface, nothing sticks up above the water and they’re difficult to see. The secret is to look up. Aquatic insects can hatch over spread-out periods of time, but they must all mate at the same time. They form mating swarms, . . .

Returning mayfly spinners or egg-laying caddisfly adults can cause intense feeding by the trout, but this situation can be misleading for fly fishermen. Because the spent insects are lying prostrate on the surface, nothing sticks up above the water, and they’re difficult to see. The secret is to look up. Aquatic insects can hatch over spread-out periods of time, but they must all mate at the same time. They form mating swarms, which hover and dip above the stream, starting at treetop level and gradually working their way down to the surface of the water. (See the video below.) If the flies are still pretty high and the fish are rising, they’re probably rising to something else; but when the flies get lower, peer closely at the surface. You should be able to see the dying flies lying with their wings spent, half spent, or fully upright.

Trout may prefer the spinners with either upright or fully spent wings—I’ve never seen them actually selectively feeding on half-spent flies. If you can’t see what they’re taking, it’s probably a spent spinner; if you see flies disappearing into the rises, they’re taking the insects whose wings haven’t collapsed yet. The one hallmark of fish taking spent flies is a very steady, deliberate rise. The trout seem to sense that the flies won’t get away and they can take their time. The only exception is at the very beginning of a fall of spent insects, when overeager trout (usually smaller ones) slash at the flies just as they touch the water. Small trout may even clear the water in an attempt to catch the flies in midair—a popular theme with calendar art, but in real life the big fish wait until the flies are trapped in the surface film and are an easy meal.

Mayfly spinners with wings that are still upright are easy to match—just use a standard adult pattern of the correct size and color. After the flies are spent, though, not only are size and color critical, but the fly must lie flush in the surface film, too. This is the time for a spentwing dry fly, such as a hackled spinner or polywing spinner. In a pinch, you can also trim all the hackle from the top and bottom of a standard dry fly with a pair of scissors or your angler’s clips.

Excerpted from The Orvis Fly-Fishing Guide, by Tom Rosenbauer.

Summer Reading for Fly Fishermen

Catch Magazine

It’s a bonanza for lovers of online fly-fishing magazines, with new issues of three great online publications. As someone who has edited a fly-fishing magazine, I can tell you that it takes a lot of work to put something like this together, and the quality of online offerings continues to improve. Click “Read More” to check them out.

It’s a bonanza right now for lovers of online fly-fishing magazines, with new issues of three great online publications. As someone who has edited a fly-fishing magazine, I can tell you that it takes a lot of work to put something like this together, and the quality of online offerings continues to improve. Check them out.

Catch Magazine

The latest issue of Catch Magazine features excellent photo essays on such diverse subjects as sea-run cutthroats of Puget Sound, big muskies in the Midwest, lake trout in Canada’s Northwest Territories, and bonefish on a live-aboard yacht in the Bahamas. As usual, Todd Moen has produced some exceptional video of a young Chilean boy working to become a fly fisher.

Patagonia Journal

In the new
Patagonia Journal (about the Chilean region of Patagonia, not the sporting clothier), there’s a fine article about fishing a very remote stream in a section below a canyon called “The Gates of Hell.” Other features profile wildlife artist Diane Michelin and the amazing asado–the traditional Patagonian method for cooking meat over an open fire.

Blood Knot Magazine

Finally, the new issue of
Blood Knot is called “The Throwback Issue” and features a remarkable array of articles on the history of fly fishing. This is one of the more info- and entertainment-heavy online magazines ever: interviews with John Gierach and Lori-Ann Murphy, a timeline of the long history of the Orvis Company, a look at fly-fishing in Cuba yesterday and today, and a whole lot more. Women, in particular should be interested in this issue because there are several articles about the rise of female anglers.

“The Blitz: A Year on the Road” Trailer

If you love fly-fishing for stripers, bluefish, false albacore, and other denizens of the sea off the Eastern Coast, you’re gonna love this. Photographer Tosh Brown and angler Pete McDonald (who writes the Fishing Jones blog) spent a year chasing fish from Casco Bay, Maine, to the Outer Banks of North Carolina. The result is the book The Blitz: Fly Fishing the Atlantic Migration.

In the disclaimer for the video, Brown writes, “This entire production was shot on a cheap-ass camcorder that fits in a shirt pocket. It ate about 50 pounds of AA batteries during this odyssey and died of saltwater sickness about two weeks after their last shoot.” But I think you’ll agree that it’s still plenty fun to watch, especially because it features cameos from some of the sport’s biggest names.

If you love fly-fishing for stripers, bluefish, false albacore, and other denizens of the sea off the Eastern Coast, you’re gonna love this. Photographer Tosh Brown and angler Pete McDonald (who writes the Fishing Jones blog) spent a year chasing fish from Casco Bay, Maine, to the Outer Banks of North Carolina. The result is the book The Blitz: Fly Fishing the Atlantic Migration.

In the disclaimer for the video, Brown writes, “This entire production was shot on a cheap-ass camcorder that fits in a shirt pocket. It ate about 50 pounds of AA batteries during this odyssey and died of saltwater sickness about two weeks after their last shoot.” But I think you’ll agree that it’s still plenty fun to watch, especially because it features cameos from some of the sport’s biggest names.

2011 Orvis-Endorsed Operations Awards

For twenty years the Orvis Company has been recognizing excellence in sporting experiences through its Endorsed Lodges, Outfitters, and Guides program. Each endorsed operation has its own character, but all share the same high standards: great service, great fishing or wingshooting, and an experienced, professional staff. These standards of excellence are continually reviewed by the Orvis staff and evaluated by visiting guests in post-visit critiques sent directly to The Orvis Company. Orvis-Endorsed operations cater to every ability from beginners to experts.

At their annual Endorsed Operations Rendezvous in Key Largo, Florida and Endorsed Guide Rendezvous in Casper, Wyoming the Orvis Company announced the winners of their 2011 Endorsed Lodges, Outfitters, and Guide Awards. There are seven categories, three for lodge operations and four for guiding operations. The awards are chosen based on customer survey feedback that Orvis solicits from their customers who patronize these operations.

For twenty years the Orvis Company has been recognizing excellence in sporting experiences through its Endorsed Lodges, Outfitters, and Guides program. Each endorsed operation has its own character, but all share the same high standards: great service, great fishing or wingshooting, and an experienced, professional staff. These standards of excellence are continually reviewed by the Orvis staff and evaluated by visiting guests in post-visit critiques sent directly to The Orvis Company. Orvis-Endorsed operations cater to every ability from beginners to experts.

At their annual Endorsed Operations Rendezvous in Key Largo, Florida and Endorsed Guide Rendezvous in Casper, Wyoming the Orvis Company announced the winners of their 2011 Endorsed Lodges, Outfitters, and Guide Awards. There are seven categories, three for lodge operations and four for guiding operations. The awards are chosen based on customer survey feedback that Orvis solicits from their customers who patronize these operations.

“We feel the best criteria for these awards is customer response,” says David Perkins, Executive Vice Chairman of Orvis. “What we at Orvis think is not nearly as important as the quality of the experience the customer receives. Each year we go through these surveys and find those operations that have given our customers an extraordinary experience and service. It is a difficult task because all of our endorsed operations are excellent or they wouldn’t be in the program, but each year there are those that really stand out.”

I’ve attended the awards ceremony a couple of times, and trust me, these lodges and guides take this honor very seriously. I remember one acceptance speech in which the owner of an outfitting business got choked up describing the adversity he’d overcome to achieve such success.

The 2011 winners are:

2011orvisawards

Wingshooting Lodge of the Year
Greystone Castle in Mingus, TX, a 5,000 acre hunting preserve for upland birds and waterfowl, specializing in providing large numbers of hard-flying birds and high volumes of shooting.

Fly-Fishing Lodge of the Year
Crystal Creek Lodge on the Naknek River in the Bristol Bay Region of southwest Alaska. Crystal Creek has been endorsed by the Orvis Company for nearly two decades and is considered one of the finest fishing lodges in the world.

International Lodge of the Year
Estancia Tecka, in Patagonia, is one of the biggest ranches in South America. The fly-fishing lodge is set up with some of the best English-speaking guides in Argentina, and they are well outfitted with drift boats to get to the best pools on the Corcovado River.

Outfitter of the Year
CB’s Saltwater Outfitters in Sarasota, Florida. Their Fishing Charter Service serves Siesta Key, as well as, Longboat Key, Lido Key, Sarasota, and Venice, and offers inshore/backcountry & offshore fishing charters for both fly-fishing and spin anglers.

Expedition of the Year
Fortress Lake Retreat of Alberta, Canada provides a full-service lodge accommodation and guided fishing experience, as well as providing hikers, canoeists, and kayakers a back-country oasis near Jasper and Banff National Parks and Lake Louise.

Guide Service of the Year
Sunrise Anglers of Boulder, Colorado offers a tremendous diversity of fishing on the Front Range of the Rockies, fishing the Colorado, Blue, South Platte, and Roaring Fork Rivers, as well as a number of small rivers, creeks, and still waters.

Guide of the Year
Derek Young of Snoqualmie, Washington specializes in fishing the Yakima River, famous for its wild cutthroat and rainbow trout.

Friday Film Festival 07.08.11

Welcome to another edition of the OrvisNews.com Friday Film Festival, in which we scour “teh Interweb” for the best fly-fishing footage available. This week, we’re pretty much concentrated on Argentina and Scandinavia, with just a couple exceptions. Where were all the U.S. filmmakers this week? Perhaps the high water caused by massive runoff out West has resulted in a brief halt to the fishing-video-industrial complex in North America. Never fear, though, . . .

Welcome to another edition of the OrvisNews.com Friday Film Festival, in which we scour “teh Interweb” for the best fly-fishing footage available. This week, we’re pretty much concentrated on Argentina and Scandinavia, with just a couple exceptions. Where were all the U.S. filmmakers this week? Perhaps the high water caused by massive runoff out West has resulted in a brief halt to the fishing-video-industrial complex in North America. Never fear, though, because we’ve got plenty of great dry-fly action, absolutely ginormous trout, and even a contest you can enter. The quality of filmmaking just keeps going up, and every week it becomes more and more difficult to choose what goes in the FFF and what other great stuff we have to leave out. Remember: We surf, so you don’t have to. Enjoy!


Wow. The quality of the video you can shoot with a digital SLR these days is astonishing. Here’s some great footage of cruising trout, some sweet takes in shallow water, and just plain gorgeous landscape imagery. Kinda makes me want to go back to Argentina ASAP (although it helps to remember that it’s actually winter down there right now).

Clear Waters from Luke Bannister on Vimeo.

In the comments on the bowfin post earlier this week, some folks expressed a desire for “more traditional” fly-fishing content. Well, here you go. Casting cane rods to wild trout in the wilds of Wales is almost as traditional as you can get. There are a few fish here, but it’s mostly a mood piece that really captures the serenity of a lone angler on a small stream.

Saltwater Diaries Babyshark from The Fly Fishing Nation on Vimeo.

I’ve seen plenty of sharks on the flats, but it never really occurred to me to cast to one. Seeing how this little guy fights, however, I might pack some fleshy flies and bite tippet next time I head out after bonefish. Listening to the howling wind in this video, one suspects the search for bones was difficult, so the anglers decided to make the most of it.

Dry or Die Rolf from Rolf Nylinder on Vimeo.

You gotta love Rolf. The boy does love to fish, and he makes no attempt to temper his childlike glee when he hooks this fine brown on his first cast. It’s only later that we learn how the day before had an effect on his reaction shown here. Yeeeap!

No finer moments! from Simon Graham on Vimeo.

Many years ago, Jeff Currier told me about fly-fishing for pike in salt water off Finland, and I’ve been fascinated by the concept ever since. This trailer focuses on the best part of catching any fish, the release, and it whets my appetite for the finished film.

Rio Gallegos – Las Buitreras Fishing from Solid Adventures on Vimeo.

The Rio Gallegos, in far southern Argentina, is known for its huge brown trout and incessant wind. Hooking one of these monsters isn’t easy, but the payoff is spectacular. This video describes the fishery and explains one man’s fascination with it over a couple decades.

The Shadow Cast Competition from Jazz and Fly Fishing´s Jazzcam on Vimeo.

We’ve featured several Jazz and Fly Fishing videos in the FFF over the last several months, so I was excited to learn that they’ve launched a contest to discover the world’s best “Shadow Caster.” I suspect that this is going to generate a lot of fun entries.

Murph Training, Part XVIII: Water, Water Everywhere

murph leaps

Murph makes the leap

photo by Tim Bronson

Now that the heat of summer is upon us, I’ve transferred some of Murph’s simple retrieve drills on land to the water. As one might expect, there is no shortage of love for the water in Murph.

The cool thing about working here at Orvis is we have a pond right outside the door, complete with an island in the middle, which offers a number of opportunities for giving Murph different looks. Obviously at this stage I’m not trying to get too tricky here, just offer him easy, focused retrieves where he gets to do a little swimming.

murph leaps
Murph makes the leap
photo by Tim Bronson

Now that the heat of summer is upon us, I’ve transferred some of Murph’s simple retrieve drills on land to the water. As one might expect, there is no shortage of love for the water in Murph.

The cool thing about working here at Orvis is we have a pond right outside the door, complete with an island in the middle, which offers a number of opportunities to give Murph different looks. Obviously at this stage, I’m not trying to get too tricky here, just offer him easy, focused retrieves where he gets to do a little swimming.

 

murph pond
Murph makes his way

photo by Tim Bronson

 

As with all the other retrieve drills we’re doing, I’m not just throwing a dummy and sending him. I throw the dummy, let him mark it, and then we walk away to various points and retrieve from different angles. This forces him to first mark the retrieve and remember it, and it forces him to be calm, as he doesn’t get to go immediately. When I do position him for the retrieve, he has to sit there quietly with no excessive movement or flinching.

In regard to this, one of the best things I ever did and am still doing with him is making him sit calmly next to me while I’m holding his food dish and then walk at heel quietly over to his feeding spot and sit quietly and not eat until I release him. I’ve been doing this with him since the first day I got him, and it has paid off very well in his patience and calm nature prior to being sent on a retrieve. It’s amazing how quickly he settles down when he knows that’s the only way he’s going to get the reward, be it food or fun.

murph swims
Murph makes his way back with the dummy
photo by Tim Bronson

As for the water retrieves, I am sending him on a short swim, a long swim, and then a swim to the island–where he has to swim over, go up on the land and then come back across the water. It’s a short distance, but it’s forcing him to put a couple of things together: swim, into the woods, find the dummy, swim, and back to me. Just a note: One thing to avoid is sending a young dog on a swim that brings him past land on the return. Invariably, they will head for the land so they can run back to you. One great way to ensure his coming straight back is to attach a 50-foot check cord and pull him straight back to you if he begins to veer. He will get the idea very quickly.

 

murph shakes
A good shake spells success
photo by Tim Bronson


Once again, not getting too tricky here, but I’m always looking to add just another small dimension to challenge him while constantly reinforcing the simple basics.

 

 

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How to Match the Hatch

Choosing the correct fly at the height of an insect hatch, when the trout are selective, is the most complicated, exasperating, and, when you find the right fly, satisfying experience in fly-fishing. The challenge involves not only what species of insect the fish are feeding on, but also the stage—is it an emerging adult, a drifting nymph, or a spent egg-laying adult?

The classic case of dry-fly fishing is when you arrive at a stream or lake to find the trout rising and the water covered with hatching mayflies. You pluck a fly from the air or the surface of the water, lay it on the lid of your fly box, and choose the fly in your box that matches it in size, shape, and color. Then you proceed to catch lots of fish.

It’s seldom that easy. . . .

Choosing the correct fly at the height of an insect hatch, when the trout are selective, is the most complicated, exasperating, and, when you find the right fly, satisfying experience in fly-fishing. The challenge involves not only what species of insect the fish are feeding on, but also the stage—is it an emerging adult, a drifting nymph, or a spent egg-laying adult?

The classic case of dry-fly fishing is when you arrive at a stream or lake to find the trout rising and the water covered with hatching mayflies. You pluck a fly from the air or the surface of the water, lay it on the lid of your fly box, and choose the fly in your box that matches it in size, shape, and color. Then you proceed to catch lots of fish.

It’s seldom that easy. Faults in your presentation may tip the fish off to the fact that your fly isn’t real. (We’ll cover those problems in a future post.) You can have what is called a masking hatch, usually a large fly that is hatching at the same time as a smaller, less obvious fly. But the trout may prefer the smaller fly, because it’s more abundant or easier to capture.

Every trout-stream insect has a Latin or scientific name, and you may hear other fly fishermen using these names. Latin names eliminate confusion about insect hatches between different areas of the country—an Ephemerella subvaria is called a Hendrickson in some parts of the country and a Whirling Blue Dun in others. It isn’t necessary to know Latin names to catch fish. It isn’t even necessary to know the names of the flies in your box until it’s time to reorder. As long as you can match the natural to its imitation, you’ll be a successful fly fisherman.

The secret is observation. Before you start flailing the water with your favorite dry fly, watch the fish that are rising. Find one that’s rising steadily, and keep your eyes glued to the spot. Did he take the big cream mayfly or the little gray one? Perhaps he keeps rising but the flies that float over his head remain untouched. Are there bubbles after a take? If there are none, he’s probably taking the emerging nymphs just under the surface.

Subsurface Clues

Here is what usually happens during a hatch: from a couple of days to an hour before the flies hatch, the nymphs or pupae become restless and drift in the current or scamper around on the aquatic vegetation in a lake. Trout pick off these nymphs, but we have no clues unless there has been a hatch for the past few days or your fishing diary or a book on trout-stream insects tells you a hatch is due on this date.

Because the trout are preoccupied with underwater food, they’ll probably ignore floating flies, so you’ll want to try a wet fly or nymph. Turn over a few rocks on the stream bottom. The flies that are due to emerge will be more abundant on rocks at the stream’s edge, and their wing cases will be almost black. Choose a nymph from your fly box that matches them as closely as possible.

At the beginning of the hatch, you’ll see a few flies in the air and a few on the water. Rises will probably be scattered and erratic. What you’re most likely seeing is fish feeding just under the surface; occasionally they’ll misjudge and break the surface or cause a swirl. This is the time for a wet fly fished just under the surface, an emerger pattern, or a floating nymph.

Trout feeding just under the surface can be exasperating. You see a fish rise, toss your dry fly to him, he splashes at it, the water bulges under it—and you strike and come away empty. This is called a refusal. It may occur because your fly is the wrong size, but often occurs because the fish doesn’t want a fly that is floating that high. He puts on the brakes at the last second, but his momentum causes him to break the surface. You might think that he missed your fly or you didn’t strike quickly enough. Don’t believe it. An adult trout seldom misses his target, and when he wants a dry fly it’s tough to take it away from him.

Another clue to subsurface feeding is a splashy rise from which erupts an adult fly that flies away. The fish has chased a nymph off the bottom but hasn’t been quick enough. This is a very common sight during caddisfly emergence. If you see little mothlike flies popping out of rise forms, put away your dry flies and fish a caddis-pupa imitation just below the surface.

During hatches of many mayflies and caddisflies, the trout take the emerging flies throughout the hatch and bother little with the adult flies resting on the water’s surface. You may catch a few on dry flies, especially if your fly isn’t floating too well, but you would have been more successful using an emerger or wet-fly pattern. In most hatches, however, there will come a time when there will be enough flies on the surface to tempt the trout to take the adult insects—and your high-floating dry flies. Rises will be deliberate, rhythmic, and you’ll see bubbles.

Splashy rises indicate fish taking insects that are fluttering on the water; as I’ve said before, this usually indicates a caddisfly hatch. A downwing dry fly of the correct size and color should work. Rises to adult mayflies are usually more sedate, unless the mayflies are very large or the wind is blowing them across the surface like tiny sailboats.

It’s usually not good enough to gauge the size and color of a hatching fly by observing it in the air or on the water. Flies look larger in the air, and color in a moving insect can be deceiving. Catch a sample to be sure that your match is correct.

At the height of a hatch you may see fish taking adult flies, know you’re fishing with the right size and color, and know that your presentation is OK—and still get refusals. This is the time to switch from a standard hackled dry to a thorax fly, no-hackle, or comparadun, something with a slightly cleaner silhouette. The change to a different pattern of the same size and color will often fool a difficult surfacefeeding trout.

There are thousands of different dry-fly patterns. Most aquatic insects are gray, cream, brown, or olive, and if you have one pattern in each of these colors in sizes 10 through 24 you’ll be able to match almost any insect hatch in the world. This approach is much less confusing than trying to fill your fly box with hundreds of different patterns, many of them redundant when it comes to imitating a particular insect.

Excerpted from The Orvis Fly-Fishing Guide, by Tom Rosenbauer.

Repost: Deep Thoughts

[Editor’s Note: A buddy of mine just returned from Montana, where the water was pretty high everywhere he fished. He stressed that the key to success was getting flies deep, so it seemed a good time to repost this from last September.] 

Many years ago on Maine’s Rapid River, when I was still a relative newcomer to the sport, I learned a valuable lesson about getting my flies deep enough. It was the middle of a hot June day, . . .

[Editor’s Note: A buddy of mine just returned from Montana, where the water was pretty high everywhere he fished. He stressed that the key to success was getting flies deep, so it seemed a good time to repost this from last fall. Originally posted on September 27, 2010.]

Many years ago on Maine’s Rapid River, when I was still a relative newcomer to the sport, I learned a valuable lesson about getting my flies deep enough. It was the middle of a hot June day, there was no surface activity, and I was fishing a Hare’s Ear Nymph with a floating line and a strike indicator. Although I hadn’t even gotten a bump all day, a guy upstream from me was landing gorgeous, chunky brook trout at the rate of about one every half hour.

I finally couldn’t take it anymore, so I reeled in and walked up to find out what his secret was. I noticed that his fly line was brown, he had no indicator, and his nymph made a tremendous plop! when it landed. While I stood there, he hooked and landed another brookie, which measured at least 16 inches.

Having noticed my obvious interest, he explained what he was doing.

“The fish are right on the bottom in the deepest water,” he said, “and this fast current means that you need a lot of weight to get down to them.”

It turned out that he was fishing a heavily weighted stonefly imitation on a full-sinking line. He would cast to the very top of the pool, make an immediate mend, and then let the fly sink, drift, and swing. When I asked him if he lost a lot of flies on the bottom, he said, “Sure. I’ve lost about a dozen flies today…but I’ve caught eight or nine big trout. These flies are easy to tie, so I figure it’s worth it.”

His method was crude, but there was no denying its effectiveness. But from that encounter, I took away two important concepts: a) big fish live near the bottom, and b) it takes special tackle and tactics to reach those fish. When you know you’re gonna have to get your flies to the bottom fast, a couple of split shot ain’t gonna do it. Make sure you plan ahead.

Podcast- 12 Steps to Better Summer Dry Fly Fishing

This week in the Fly Box section, we talk about rod actions, line sizes, sunscreen, and dry flies in high water. In the main event, we’ll give you some tips on summer dry flies, as summer is prime time for fishing on the surface.

We also have a great, new way to participate with The Orvis Fly Fishing Guide Podcast. Go to orvisnews.com/podcast.aspx to participate in our online forum to suggest podcast ideas or discuss episodes.

Click the READ MORE button to listen to this week’s episode.

This week in the Fly Box section, we talk about rod actions, line sizes, sunscreen, and dry flies in high water. In the main event, we’ll give you some tips on summer dry flies, as summer is prime time for fishing on the surface.

We also have a great, new way to participate with The Orvis Fly Fishing Guide Podcast. Go to orvisnews.com/podcast.aspx to participate in our online forum to suggest podcast ideas or discuss episodes.

Click the play button below to listen to this episode. Go to orvis.com/podcast to subscribe to future episodes

If you cannot see the podcast player, please click this link to listen.