Orvis Dogs of the Day- Milly, Maddie, and Piper!


Orvis Cover Dog Contest - Milly, Maddie, and Piper


Winter getaway at the beach
– Sasha, Salt Lake City

Enter the Orvis Cover Dog Photo contest for your chance to put your dog on a future cover of the The Orvis Dog Book catalog, win a $500 gift card from Orvis and help us beat canine cancer! Enter online at https://www.orvis.com/coverdog.


Orvis Cover Dog Contest - Milly, Maddie, and Piper


Winter getaway at the beach
– Sasha, Salt Lake City

Enter the Orvis Cover Dog Photo contest for your chance to put your dog on a future cover of the The Orvis Dog Book catalog, win a $500 gift card from Orvis and help us beat canine cancer! Enter online at https://www.orvis.com/coverdog.

Conservation News 9.29.10

The Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office has been awarded $27.5 million to be used for salmon-recovery efforts. The grant, from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery Fund, will be used for everything from habitat restoration to
fish-hatchery improvements to increased monitoring. Another $10.8 million was awarded to the Washington DFW to be used in Columbia Basin hatcheries.

The Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office has been awarded $27.5 million to be used for salmon-recovery efforts. The grant, from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery Fund, will be used for everything from habitat restoration to fish-hatchery improvements to increased monitoring. Another $10.8 million was awarded to the Washington DFW to be used in Columbia Basin hatcheries.

 


conservation icon 
Ever since oil began spilling into the Gulf of Mexico last spring, biologists have worried that the heaviest toll would be on juvenile fish, which would mean that the spill’s true effects would not be known for a few years. Recent evidence, based on fish counts in the region, suggest that these young fish may have “dodged a bullet” according to Joel Fodrie, a researcher with the University of North Carolina’s Institute of Marine Science who has been studying seagrass meadows along the coast for five years.


conservation icon 
A group of 11 U.S. senators, led by Alaska’s Mark Begich are trying to stop the Food and Drug Administration from approving genetically modified Atlantic salmon for human consumption. The AquaAdvantage salmon grows twice as fast as wild salmon because it has been given a growth hormone from Chinook salmon and a gene from an eel-like ocean pout. According to Begich, the health and environmental questions about such a fish cannot be adequately evaluated by the public, and the group of senators argues that the FDA is using the wrong approval process.

 

Restoring the Mighty Penobscot- Trout Unlimited Joins the Orvis Fly Fishing Guide Podcast

The Penobscot River provides the largest freshwater input into the Gulf of Maine, and there are important connections between sea-run fish and groundfish and other commercially important species in Penobscot Bay.
Photo: Cheryl Daigle

We are adding a new feature to the Orvis Fly Fishing Guide Podcast by partnering with Trout Unlimited to bring you updates on their conservation programs. Tom is a huge fan of Trout Unlimited and Orvis has been a long-time partner in their efforts to restore and protect coldwater fisheries.
In this episode TU President & CEO Chris Wood interviews Jeff Reardon about restoring the Penobscot River. Involving miles and miles of river and multiple dam removals, this is the largest project of its kind in history.
We hope you enjoy this new feature of The Orvis Fly Fishing Guide Podcast. Let us know what you think on our Facebook wall at facebook.com/orvisflyfishing or by dropping us a line at podcast@orvis.com. Listen by clicking the play button below.


The Penobscot River provides the largest freshwater input into the Gulf of Maine, and there are important connections between sea-run fish and groundfish and other commercially important species in Penobscot Bay.
Photo: Cheryl Daigle

We are adding a new feature to the Orvis Fly Fishing Guide Podcast by partnering with Trout Unlimited to bring you updates on their conservation programs. Tom is a huge fan of Trout Unlimited and Orvis has been a long-time partner in their efforts to restore and protect coldwater fisheries.

In this episode TU President & CEO Chris Wood interviews Jeff Reardon about restoring the Penobscot River. Involving miles and miles of river and multiple dam removals, this is the largest project of its kind in history.

We hope you enjoy this new feature of The Orvis Fly Fishing Guide Podcast. Let us know what you think on our Facebook wall at facebook.com/orvisflyfishing or by dropping us a line at podcast@orvis.com. Listen by clicking the play button below.

In the Loop 9.28.10

Matt Skoglund of the Natural Resources Defense Council describes the pleasures of finding and fishing for golden trout on a three-day trip with his brother into the wild Beartooth Mountains of Montana. These small, beautiful fish have been an obsession since Skoglund was a child: That you can’t find goldens in roadside rivers also titillated me. To catch a golden,…

Matt Skoglund of the Natural Resources Defense Council describes the pleasures of finding and fishing for golden trout on a three-day trip with his brother into the wild Beartooth Mountains of Montana. These small, beautiful fish have been an obsession since Skoglund was a child: “That you can’t find goldens in roadside rivers also titillated me. To catch a golden, you had to hike to them – you had to earn it.” 

fish icon Fly fishermen will be in the pink this fall in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, where the pink salmon are running up the Saint Marys River. Although Great Lakes pinks spawn every year—unlike their oceangoing cousins—even years see bigger runs, and this one’s a doozy. Eric Sharp offers all the details in the Detroit Free Press.

Brookies for a Good Cause

Big Native Brookie
Few fish are more beautiful than a native, male brook trout in its fall glory.
Photo by Phil Monahan, 2010

Last winter, Casting for Recovery held an online auction to raise money for their programs, which combine fly fishing, counseling, and medical information to help breast-cancer patients and survivors focus on wellness instead of illness. One of the auction items was a day of fishing in southwestern Vermont,…

Big Native Brookie

Few fish are more beautiful than a native, male brook trout in its fall glory.
Photo by Phil Monahan, 2010

Last winter, Casting for Recovery held an online auction to raise money for their programs, which combine fly fishing, counseling, and medical information to help breast-cancer patients and survivors focus on wellness instead of illness. One of the auction items was a day of fishing in southwestern Vermont, with me as the guide, which was purchased by Casey Peltier, from Arlington, Virginia. Once the auction ended, we made a date for late September, when Casey would be visiting Vermont for a family get-together.

Big Rainbow

Casey ended her day on a mountain pond where the rainbows will eat anything, apparently.

Photo by Phil Monahan, 2010

As the summer progressed and the drought grew worse, however, I began to wonder if there’d be any water left by our appointed date. When Casey arrived last week, the Battenkill was lower than I’d ever seen it, and the mountain streams weren’t much better, so I feared that our much-anticipated day on the water would be a total bust. To her credit, Casey told me right off the bat that she realized our summer had been hot and dry, had adjusted her expectations accordingly, but was still looking forward to a fun day on the water, fishless or not. Her optimism was contagious, and I could feel my anxiety level drop. 

We got on the Battenkill at dawn, setting up downstream of the West Arlington Grange covered bridge and casting streamers to a deep slot. Although the cool nights had caused the river’s temperature to drop into the high ’50s, the water was extremely low and clear. After three hours of fruitless casting and plenty of enjoyable conversation, we decided to see if we could scare up some native brook trout.

I am a brookie fanatic, and one of my favorite kinds of fly fishing involves scrambling over boulders and casting into plunge pools in mountain streams. Casey was game, enduring some tough wading and walking conditions, and we found some gorgeous trout willing to take dry flies. At this time of the year, the brookies are sporting their spawning colors, which can be spectacular, especially on the big males. In the middle of one long pool, Casey’s fly disappeared in a big splash, and she brought to hand a stunning 7- or 8-inch trout, a real trophy in this neck of the woods. We marveled at its colors, snapped a quick picture, and carefully released it to make more trout just like it. After a couple hours, Casey said, “I’ve lost count of how many I’ve caught, which is a good sign.”

We finished the day on a friend’s pond, where Casey managed to take several nice rainbows on a Gartside’s Wet Mouse. Lord knows what the trout thought they were eating. It was a fine end to an enjoyable day, which turned out to be a lot more successful than I thought. Who knew raising money for a great cause could be so much fun?

Rehabilitating the Dogs Rescued from Michael Vick’s Kennels

Ever wonder what happened to the dogs raised to fight and then rescued from Michel Vick’s “Bad Newz Kennels”? National Public radio ran a piece a few days ago on the efforts to rehabilitate those dogs and the people behind the effort.

“We had started developing a battery of tests … : Could you touch the dog and handle the dog? Was the dog reactive? How did it respond to people? How did it respond to other dogs? Was the dog safe around food, toys and children? Things like that. So when we sat down to take a look at [the Vick] case, we needed to understand what the potential aggression problems were going to be. And we also needed to satisfy the government’s concerns about liability. If this dog goes out and we permitted it and it attacks a small child, it’s going to get back to us somehow. So we really needed to demonstrate to the government that the dogs were going to be safe when we made some recommendations for placement.”

You can listen the story or read it in its entirety here.

Ever wonder what happened to the dogs raised to fight and then rescued from Michel Vick’s “Bad Newz Kennels”? National Public radio ran a piece a few days ago on the efforts to rehabilitate those dogs and the people behind the effort.

“We had started developing a battery of tests … : Could you touch the dog and handle the dog? Was the dog reactive? How did it respond to people? How did it respond to other dogs? Was the dog safe around food, toys and children? Things like that. So when we sat down to take a look at [the Vick] case, we needed to understand what the potential aggression problems were going to be. And we also needed to satisfy the government’s concerns about liability. If this dog goes out and we permitted it and it attacks a small child, it’s going to get back to us somehow. So we really needed to demonstrate to the government that the dogs were going to be safe when we made some recommendations for placement.”

You can listen the story or read it in its entirety here.

Orvis Dog of the Day- Goliath!

Orvis Cover Dog Contest - Goliath

Orvis Cover Dog Contest – Goliath
Goliath in the back yard.
– James, Dorset

Enter the Orvis Cover Dog Photo contest for your chance to put your dog on a future cover of the The Orvis Dog Book catalog, win a $500 gift card from Orvis and help us beat canine cancer! Enter online at https://www.orvis.com/s/welcome-to-the-orvis-cover-dog-photo-contest/6335.


Orvis Cover Dog Contest - Goliath

Orvis Cover Dog Contest – Goliath
Goliath in the back yard.
– James, Dorset

Enter the Orvis Cover Dog Photo contest for your chance to put your dog on a future cover of the The Orvis Dog Book catalog, win a $500 gift card from Orvis and help us beat canine cancer! Enter online at https://www.orvis.com/s/welcome-to-the-orvis-cover-dog-photo-contest/6335.

Orvis Dog of the Day- Shadow!

Orvis Cover Dog Contest - Shadow

Looking through the gate
– Shelia, Drexel


Enter the Orvis Cover Dog Photo contest for your chance to put your dog on a future cover of the The Orvis Dog Book catalog, win a $500 gift card from Orvis and help us beat canine cancer! Enter online at https://www.orvis.com/coverdog.


Orvis Cover Dog Contest - Shadow

Looking through the gate
– Shelia, Drexel


Enter the Orvis Cover Dog Photo contest for your chance to put your dog on a future cover of the The Orvis Dog Book catalog, win a $500 gift card from Orvis and help us beat canine cancer! Enter online at https://www.orvis.com/coverdog.

In the Loop 9.24.10

Robert Humston, a biology professor from Virgina’s Washington and Lee University, has been studying the
impact of stocked trout in reservoirs on the Commonwealth’s native brook trout. His findings so far are fascinating: it turns out that the stocked trout may actually help

Robert Humston, a biology professor from Virgina’s Washington and Lee University, has been studying the
impact of stocked trout in reservoirs on the Commonwealth’s native
brook trout. His findings so far are fascinating: it turns out that the stocked trout may actually help the wild trout survive longer.

“Introducing this separate population of hatchery
trout with a different genetic signature is adding more variation. That
diversity increases the likelihood that a population can adapt to
changes,” he said. “At the same time, the hatchery trout haven’t
impacted the native species yet. And if we haven’t diluted any local
adaptation by the native trout they may be better able to persist in
the long term.”

fish icon Two moving articles—here and here—on the great work being done by Project Healing Waters to help combat veterans take their minds of their injuries and relax in the great outdoors.

fish icon The drought in the Northeast is bad enough that the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection has decided not to do any fall stocking in several streams in the eastern part of the state.

fish icon Trout-habitat-restoration work on the Battenkill has been temporarily halted by the discovery of an archaeological site containing evidence of an ancient campsite along the river.

fish icon A father and son from New Zealand decided to try their luck in a rather unscenic piece of water—a canal close to a powerhouse. Lookie what dad caught.

(photo: Sandy Hays)

Rowing for the Cure

If you’re fishing on the Henry’s Fork in Idaho this weekend, don’t be surprised if something large and startling appears from upstream. No, it’s not the world’s biggest strike indicator. It’s a first-of-its-kind hot-pink RO drift boat, representing Rowing for the Cure, that’s sure to stand out from the other watercraft on the river. The project is the brainchild…

If you’re fishing on the Henrys Fork in Idaho this weekend, don’t be surprised if something large and startling appears from upstream. No, it’s not the world’s biggest strike indicator. It’s a first-of-its-kind hot-pink RO drift boat, representing Rowing for the Cure, that’s sure to stand out from the other watercraft on the river. The project is the brainchild of a group of fly-fishing-industry professionals whose goal was to come up with a new way to raise awareness and money to support breast-cancer research.   

Rance Rathie and Travis Smith, owners of Patagonia River Guides, developed the original the concept for the pink boat, and Robert Eddins, owner of RO drift boats, donated his time and facility to make the idea a reality. The fishing and PR campaign was put together by Ian Davis, co-owner of Bozeman-based Yellow Dog Flyfishing Adventures (his mother, Judy, died of breast cancer, which is why “Judy” is imprinted on the back of the boat in her honor) and Whitney McDowell, an avid angler and marketing professional, whose mother is a two-time breast cancer survivor.

The boat will travel around the West, being handed from guide to guide. On the water, the guides will accept donations from clients, other guides and anglers, or anyone else who wants to help. So far this month, the Pink Boat has made appearances at the Jackson Hole One Fly and the second-annual Stripping for a Cure event on the South Fork of the Snake.

All funds will go directly to the Montana Affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure, and the guides who raise the most money will be recognized for their achievements. So if you happen to be on a Western river this fall, consider carrying your checkbook in your vest. For more information, check out Rowing for the Cure on facebook, or visit the Montana Susan G. Komen for a Cure Web site.