Master Class Monday: How to Know When a Trout Will Take Your Fly

You won’t find numerous trout feeding every time you fish a trout stream, but you do run into this situation, there are ways to find the one trout that is more likely to take your fly. Dave Jensen . . .


You won’t find numerous trout feeding every time you fish a trout stream, but you do run into this situation, there are ways to find the one trout that is more likely to take your fly. Dave Jensen gives us some clues for finding the trout most likely to eat. It’s a great fly-fishing lesson and another example of how observation of fish behavior can help you be a more successful angler.

Watch for further installments of Master Class Monday every week here at Orvis News, in the Advanced Tactics playlist our You Tube Channel, and on the new Advanced section of our Orvis Fly Fishing Learning Center.

Click here for all Master Class Monday videos.

Master Class Monday: How to Fish Jig-Head Streamers

There are times when conventional fly-fishing techniques won’t get your fly deep enough, especially in heavy water. This is the time to use a heavy jig-head streamer, combined with either a Power Taper floating line or a fast-sinking line like the . . .


There are times when conventional fly-fishing techniques won’t get your fly deep enough, especially in heavy water. This is the time to use a heavy jig-head streamer, combined with either a Power Taper floating line or a fast-sinking line like the Depth Charge. The object is to get your fly as quickly as possible into deep pools and runs where other fly-fishing methods just can’t get your fly. Dave Jensen shows you how to do it–the method is not pretty, but it is deadly on large brown and rainbow trout.

Watch for further installments of Master Class Monday every week here at Orvis News, in the Advanced Tactics playlist our You Tube Channel, and on the new Advanced section of our Orvis Fly Fishing Learning Center.

Click here for all Master Class Monday videos.

Podcast: Your FAQs Answered, with Jeremy Benn of Orvis Tech Support


This week I interview my old friend Jeremy Benn, longtime Orvis employee and head of our Outfitter Team in Roanoke , Virginia. These are the wonderful people who answer all your tackle questions via e-mail, telephone, and live chat. There are certain . . .



Big News: Orvis Fly Fishing Podcast and the Orvis Hunting and Shooting Podcast are now available in their entirety on Spotify, which will update automatically when we upload new content.

This week I interview my old friend Jeremy Benn, longtime Orvis employee and head of our Outfitter Team in Roanoke , Virginia. These are the wonderful people who answer all your tackle questions via e-mail, telephone, and live chat. There are certain questions they get (and I get on podcast requests) over and over again, including:

  • What rod do I need for….?
  • Can I use the same fly rod outfit for XXX and XXX?
  • Do I really get something more when I buy a more expensive rod?
  • How much backing do I need?
  • What leader do I need for XXX?
  • I am going to XXX What flies do I need?
  • What is the best knot?

In the Fly Box this week, here is a sample of the kinds of questions I try to answer:

  • How do I become a fishing guide?
  • When do I fish upstream and when do I fish downstream?
  • Why do you put barrel swivels on your braided leaders? (We don’t.)
  • How do you avoid breaking your rod when getting flies out of trees?
  • What will be the effects of the recent hurricane on trout and saltwater fishing in North Carolina?
  • How often do you fish parachutes and Sparkle Duns as opposed to traditional dry flies?
  • How long can you keep a trout in a net if it has cool running water in the net?
  • Can I use my switch rod for schoolie stripers?
  • What flies should I use for landlocked Atlantic salmon?
  • How do I target cruising salmon and steelhead on the Chicago shoreline?
  • What happened to the Orvis app?
  • Why can’t I catch trout in tailwaters on streamers from my canoe?
  • Plus two great fly-tying tips from a listener.

If you don’t see the “Play” button above, click here to listen.


Jeremy Benn is the Orvis Answer Man.
Photo courtesy Jeremy Benn

Master Class Monday: How to Fish Riffles for Trout

Trout are often found in shallow riffles. When they are in this kind of water, they are often easy to catch, but most fly fishers ignore these hot spots because they look too shallow. Trout move . . .


Trout are often found in shallow riffles. When they are in this kind of water, they are often easy to catch, but most fly fishers ignore these hot spots because they look too shallow. Trout move into riffles to feed, though, and often you’ll be surprised to find large trout. They can be easily caught on dry flies and nymphs if you know where to look.

Watch for further installments of Master Class Monday every week here at Orvis News, in the Advanced Tactics playlist our You Tube Channel, and on the new Advanced section of our Orvis Fly Fishing Learning Center.

Click here for all Master Class Monday videos.

Classic Video Tip: How to Make the Basic Spey Cast

Skagit lines and longer rods being the ideal setup for fall and winter steelheading, I thought this video tip from Pete Kutzer—from the “Steelhead & Salmon Fly Fishing” chapter on the. . .


See All Orvis Learning Center Fly Fishing Video Lessons
With Skagit lines and longer rods being the ideal setup for fall and winter steelheading, I thought this video tip from Pete Kutzer—from the “Steelhead & Salmon Fly Fishing” chapter on the Orvis Fly Fishing Learning Center—would be appropriate this week. And since steelheading involves a lot of casting and little fish-playing, it’s an ideal time to practice your Spey technique.

Master Class Monday: How to Catch Difficult Trout

Ever have a day when you know trout are in a river but you can’t interest them? Watch as Dave Jensen cycles through a number of options to try to figure out what kind of presentation will . . .


Ever have a day when you know trout are in a river but you can’t interest them? Watch as Dave Jensen cycles through a number of options to try to figure out what kind of presentation will interest a trout that is not actively feeding. Of course, this depends on your ability to either read the water or be able to spot a trout in the water (and it helps to have a fish spotter like Amelia Jensen gauging a trout’s interest). But the thought process that goes into Dave’s choice of presentations is a real education.

Watch for further installments of Master Class Monday every week here at Orvis News, in the Advanced Tactics playlist our You Tube Channel, and on the new Advanced section of our Orvis Fly Fishing Learning Center.

Click here for all Master Class Monday videos.

Master Class Monday: How to Fish Small Dry Flies in Low Light

Most people have enough trouble fishing small dry flies without the added complication of gathering darkness. But trout often feed on small flies at dusk, and if you don’t have any tricks up your . . .


Most people have enough trouble fishing small dry flies without the added complication of gathering darkness. But trout often feed on small flies at dusk, and if you don’t have any tricks up your sleeve, you might miss out on some great dry-fly fishing for trout. Dave Jensen gives us some great tips on how to see small flies and rises as darkness gathers.

Watch for further installments of Master Class Monday every week here at Orvis News, in the Advanced Tactics playlist our You Tube Channel, and on the new Advanced section of our Orvis Fly Fishing Learning Center.

Click here for all Master Class Monday videos.

Master Class Monday: How to Spot Rising Trout

Trout rising to insects do not always make a big splash. Sometimes the disturbances they make on the surface of a river are more subtle. Dave Jensen, of Jensen Fly Fishing, offers some very . . .


Trout rising to insects do not always make a big splash. Sometimes the disturbances they make on the surface of a river are more subtle. Dave Jensen, of Jensen Fly Fishing, offers some very useful tips about how to spot trout feeding on the surface. You’ll be a more effective dry-fly angler after you watch this one, and we know you’ll enjoy the amazing photography of trout feeding on the surface.

Watch for further installments of Master Class Monday every week here at Orvis News, in the Advanced Tactics playlist our You Tube Channel, and on the new Advanced section of our Orvis Fly Fishing Learning Center.

Click here for all Master Class Monday videos.

Master Class Monday: How to Fish Streamers in Shallow Water

Fishing streamers is not always about casting large flies in deep water and heavy cover with a sinking fly line. Sometimes streamer flies are effective in shallow riffles and edges, especially . . .


Fishing streamers is not always about casting large flies in deep water and heavy cover with a sinking fly line. Sometimes streamer flies are effective in shallow riffles and edges, especially when you use smaller flies and a floating line. Dave Jensen shows you how to rig a pair of small streamers and then demonstrates what type of water you should cover when trying this method.

Watch for further installments of Master Class Monday every week here at Orvis News, in the Advanced Tactics playlist our You Tube Channel, and on the new Advanced section of our Orvis Fly Fishing Learning Center.

Click here for all Master Class Monday videos.

Classic Video Tuesday Tip: How to Wade Safely


Falling down in shallow water can be a real drag, as well as painful. But losing
your footing in deeper water can have dire consequences.
Photo courtesy Orvis Fly Fishing Learning Center

In today’s video Tuesday Tip from the Orvis Fly Fishing Learning Center, we discuss safe wading practices. With many people fishing in very cold water over the winter, and with the. . .


See All Orvis Learning Center Fly Fishing Video Lessons

In today’s video Tuesday Tip from the Orvis Fly Fishing Learning Center, we discuss safe wading practices. With many people fishing in very cold water over the winter, and with the upcoming runoff season, it’s a good time to review wading safety. (I know, it’s one of those boring but important topics and you’d rather have us give you some tips on where you can catch big fish right now and exactly how to do that. But I’ll save those subjects for Monahan.) If you’ve never done any serious wading, you should watch this video. And even if you have, it might be a good refresher—it’s not the last word on wading safety, but it will get you thinking.


Falling down in shallow water can be a real drag, as well as painful. But losing
your footing in deeper water can have dire consequences.
Photo courtesy Orvis Fly Fishing Learning Center