What to Put in Your Hunting Dog First Aid Kit


Snake bite wound after debriding is gruesome but will heal.
Photos courtesy  Greystone Castle

You take every precaution to prevent injuries when you go wingshooting, waterfowl hunting, hiking, or when you embark on a training session with your dog. Though he’s steady to shot without fail, and you’ve outfitted him with a safety vest and locator bell, there’s always a risk of accidents in the field. Your dog can have a run-in with a porcupine and walk away with a snout full of quills, or encounter a venomous snake. Branches can lash him in the eye, or briars can lacerate his legs or paws. Because of these common dangers, it’s important you carry a well-stocked first aid kit for your dog each time you head out…

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Which Water is Safe for Dogs to Drink


Photo by Gary, Madison


You’re hiking up a trail in the heat of the summer when you come to a stream. Your dog races ahead and wades in, drinking with every step. You console yourself with the fact that the stream is remote and running clear. But that pristine mountain stream likely isn’t as pure as you might like to believe. If mountain stream water isn’t clean enough to drink, what does that say about puddles and runoff in the city? We want to protect our dogs at all times, but if you allow your dog to drink non-potable water from potholes, sprinkler runoff, and other water sources during your daily walk, your dog is at risk…

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Common Insect Stings and Bites on Dogs and What to Do

If there are bees or other stinging insects around, pay close attention to your dog.
Photo by Éric Tourneret, via Wikipedia

Your dog is sniffing happily around the back yard when she suddenly yelps and starts running around in circles. It’s a good bet she had a run-in with the business end of a bee. Dogs are more at risk of bee stings than humans because they explore the world with their snouts and their four paws pad through the grass and clover—exactly where bees buzz in search of nectar. Even the most well-trained dogs can end up with a bee sting, so it’s important…

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How Far Can My Dog Hike?

Hiking with your dog can be incredibly rewarding, creating a deeper bond between you.
Photo by: Cindy Dunican

How far your dog can hike will vary significantly based on multiple factors, including her age, breed, and fitness level, as well as the length and difficulty of the hike. The easy trail at your local nature center is a far cry from hiking a 14er—a mountain with a peak above 14,000 feet. If you’re considering adding regular treks with your dog to your outdoor adventures, research, preparation, and training are critical before hitting the trail.

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9 Tips for Living with a Big Dog in a Small Space

Living with a big dog often requires a few adjustments.
Photo by By Calicodaisy – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0

Dogs adapt well to unlikely situations—one reason they’ve put up with us for so long.  But all dogs, big and small, can present different challenges at home. Living with a big dog in a small space, while it can be difficult, is not only possible but also potentially rewarding for a dog and his humans. Here are nine tips to make…

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The Seresto® Dog Collar: How Does it Work?

If you spend much time outdoors and have a dog or two, perhaps you will agree that ticks are the bane of our existence. They are a constant, ubiquitous threat to our health and sense of well-being. And, to make things worse, their numbers are increasing according to scientists.

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How to Clean a Dog Collar

Dogs love mud, and they end up soiling their collars, as well as themselves.
Photo by Jody, Stevenson

No matter how clean your dog stays or how fresh his coat, the collar he wears will eventually absorb enough skin oils, dirt, and grime to develop an odor. Dogs who spend a lot of time outdoors rolling in the mud, swimming in lakes and streams, chasing balls, or playing at the dog park are more prone to collar funk than the small lap dog who rarely ventures out and takes a weekly trip to the doggie salon. But eventually, all collars will need to be washed to keep them smelling nice—and to prevent unhygienic bacteria buildup.

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