Tag Archives: fish facts

Fish Facts: Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout


Written by: Phil Monahan

The iconic species of our oldest national park, the Yellowstone cutthroat draws anglers from around the world.
Photo by USFWS

The names of many legendary fishing spots in Yellowstone National Park—Buffalo Ford, the Lamar Valley, the meadows of Slough Creek—are synonymous with big, native Yellowstone cutthroat . . .

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Fish Facts: Siberian Taimen (Hucho taimen)


Written by: Phil Monahan

The largest of all salmonids, these voracious predators are sometimes called “river wolves.”
Photo by Ojensen at English Wikipedia

A true river monster, the taimen (Hucho taimen)—also known as the Siberian taimen—can grow to proportions that seem incredible to your average trout fishermen. Whereas John Gierach once . . .

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Fish Facts: Dolly Varden (Salvelinus malma)


Written by: Phil Monahan

This illustration of a Dolly Varden is from Evermann and Goldsborough’s The Fishes of Alaska (1907).
Photo via Wikipedia

Like the two species to which is it closely related—Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus)—the Dolly Varden (Salvelinus malma) is a true char that is found . . .

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Fish Facts: Grand Barracuda (Sphyraena barracuda)


Written by: Phil Monahan

Barracuda are a blast to chase with a fly, as they can be aggressive and fight like hell.
Photo by Greg Vincent, of H2O Bonefishing 

The great barracuda (Sphyraena barracuda) isn’t generally considered one of the premier saltwater fly rod species—it’s not part of the flats Grand Slam, for instance—and few fly fishers head to . . .

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Fish Facts: Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)


Written by: Phil Monahan

Alaska is home to some of the largest native rainbows in the world.
Photo courtesy Crystal Creek Lodge

The most widely cultivated trout species in the world, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are bred for sport and food, and they inhabit lakes and streams on every continent except . . .

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Fish Facts: Colorado River Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhyncus clarkii pleuriticus)


Written by: Phil Monahan

This Colorado River cutthroat, from southern Utah, displays dark, rich colors.
Photo by Mike Hadley

Considered one of the more beautiful trout in North America, the Colorado River cutthroat trout (Oncorhyncus clarkii pleuriticus) once inhabited the high-elevation streams and lakes of the Green . . .

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Fish Facts: Sculpins (genus Cottus)


Written by: Phil Monahan

Prickly sculpin (Cottus asper) demonstrates the classic sculpin shape: big head, wide fins, tapering body.
Photo by U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Ever since Don Gapen tied the first Muddler Minnow in 1936, fly fishers have recognized that freshwater sculpins (genus Cottus) can be important forage fish for trout, and there are now . . .

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Fish Facts: Grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella)


Written by: Phil Monahan

Chris Fowler, who works at Orvis Austin, landed this beautiful grassy in Texas last summer.
Photo by Chris Fowler

Imported from eastern Asia, the invasive grass carp has established itself from coast to coast and is recognized as one of the toughest species to catch on a fly. While the last decade has . . .

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Fish Facts: Bonneville Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhyncus clarkii utah)


Written by: Phil Monahan

A relict of the prehistoric lake that covered the Great Basin of Utah, Nevada, and Idaho—and
once thought to be extinct—the Bonneville cutthroat is making a big comeback.
Photo by Phil Monahan

The state fish of Utah, the Bonneville cutthroat trout (Oncorhyncus clarkii utah) is a survivor, having endured a geological cataclysm—which splintered the population—as well as a . . .

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Fish Facts: Pink Salmon (Oncorhyncus gorbuscha)


Written by: Phil Monahan

The large hump in front of the dorsal fin on spawning males is the reason for the species’s nickname, “Humpy.”
Illustration by Timothy Knepp – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

In the angling community, the pink salmon (Oncorhyncus gorbuscha) is not generally held in the same high esteem as its cousins, the Chinook, coho, and sockeye. However, the sheer. . .

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