Tying the Green Caddis Larva

The Green Caddis Larva—also known as the Green Rock Worm—is an old stand-by nymph pattern, which is descended from the original Rock Worm created by Missoula, Montana barber Franz Pott in the 1920s. It’s an exceptionally effective nymph pattern that imitates many species of caddisflies, in the Hydropsychidae and Ryacophillidae families. Fished alone or as a dropper, a Caddis Larva is a great searching pattern and seems attractive to even big trout, something famed fly shop owner Bob Jacklin discovered a couple years ago while filming a television show on the Madison River. On camera, Jacklin hooked and landed a 32-inch, 10-pound brown trout on a size 14 Beadhead Green Caddis Larva. It was the biggest trout he’d ever caught, anywhere.

This video, by Tim Flagler of Tightline Productions, offers clear, step-by-step instructions for tying a Green Caddis Larva. What I really like about Flagler’s videos, aside from the exceptional quality of the video itself, is that he offers clear explanations of why he ties the way he does, and he offers tips and tricks that you can apply to other patterns, as well. Here, for instance, you’ll learn a quick and easy trick for breaking the ribbing off without dulling your tying scissors.


Green Caddis Larva from Tightline Productions on Vimeo.

          The Green Caddis Larva
          Hook: Standard emerger hook (here, a Dia-Riki 125), size 16.
          
Adhesive: Superglue.
          Weight: 6 or 7 wraps of .015 lead-free wire.
          Thread: Brown, UTC 70 denier.


          Rib: Fluorescent chartreuse Ultra Wire, brassie size. 

          Dubbing: Light olive Australian possum, sparse.       
          Thorax: Dark brown Australian possum.   
          

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