Friday Fly-Fishing Film Festival 10.18.13


Written by: Phil Monahan

Welcome to a new edition of the Orvis News Friday Fly-Fishing Film Festival, in which we scour the Web for the best fly-fishing videos available. We have a great selection this week, nineteen more videos that will take you to amazing angling destinations. Europe is most definitely in the hizzee—with videos from Norway, France, and Italy—plus you’ll visit Africa, Mexico, Canada, and these here United States.

For best results, watch all videos at full-screen and in high definition. Remember, we surf so you don’t have to. But if you do stumble upon something great that you think is worthy of inclusion in a future F5, please post it in the comments below, and we’ll take a look. And don’t forget to check in regularly at The Tug, the Orvis online video theater. See you next week with a fresh set of films!


Here’s the latest video, which we promised on Wednesday, from Todd Moen of Catch Magazine. It focuses on guide Beckie Clarke and her two friends spending time on the Elk River near Fernie, British Columbia, and catching plenty of beautiful, wild cutthroats.


Wow. Wow. Wow. This video features unbelievable shots of Atlantic salmon eating—or refusing—big dry flies on Labrador’s St. Lewis River. You’ll cheer, you’ll groan, you’ll be on the edge of your seat.


This is a gorgeous rumination on the pleasures of fall fishing on the Bitterroot in western Montana. Great scenery, good hatches, and beautiful trout.


Here’s some great stuff from Lowcountry Journal about casting to redfish in the grass flats off South Carolina, and the video argues that, yes, it is all about the fish.


The latest from frontsidefly features a single rising brown trout, a dry-fly presentation, and an epic leap. All in one minute.


By now, you know what to expect from a Hooké video: great cinematography, beautiful scenery, lovely casting shots, and big fish. This one delivers.


This is our second video from Guanaja, Honduras in the past few weeks, suggesting that the secret of the great flats fishing there is out.


A float trip in Alaska with your buddies will seem like a great idea, once you’ve seen this video, with plenty of salmon, trout, and laughs.


The title of this Norwegian teaser translates to “In fits and starts.” Catching some of those gorgoeus browns on dry flies would certainly give me fits.


Good stuff from southwestern France, and I dig the cool graphic that helps you follow the fly when it’s time for the moment of truth.


There may be a couple of you in the audience who have had a fish taken off the line by a dolphin, but how many have lost a bass to a freshwater dolphin? The Provo brothers look like they’re having quite an adventure in Bolivia.


Although the title of this video is “First Redfish on Fly,” the star of the show is a tarpon.


They say that brevity is the soul of wit, and this video packs a lot into 54 seconds, capturing the magic of catching small fish on a Colorado tributary stream.


The Babine is one of those rivers you dream about as soon as you learn about wild steelhead. Here’s a great video about a weeklong trip for a few buddies last month.


Rolph Nylinder’s fly-fishing videos have been captivating us and making us laugh for a few years now, but do you know what he does when he’s not fishing? Check it out.


This trailer for an upcoming video shot on the Tronto River in western Italy features plenty of cool shots of rising fish, bugs, and fine casting.


A tigerfish expedition on the Zambesi looks like my kind of safari. I love the way they take to the air immediately upon being hooked.


I love videos that show the darker sides of the fly-fishing experience, those moments that haunt you when you lie awake at night.


Follow four buddies as they embark on a three-day adventure into the Box Canyon of the Henrys Fork and then finish their trip with two days of fishing on Henrys Lake.

6 thoughts on “Friday Fly-Fishing Film Festival 10.18.13

  1. ryan

    Glad to see the kids in the “first redfish” video know how to handle their fish…no dragging the tarpon over the gunnels or hoisting the red out of the water for a few minutes…well done gents-

    Reply

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