Friday Fly-Fishing Film Festival 10.27.17

Welcome to the latest edition of the Orvis News Friday Fly-Fishing Film Festival, in which we scour the Web for the best fly-fishing videos available. This week, we’ve got ten killer productions that really span the globe and cover a wide variety of species–from parrotfish in New Caledonia to brown trout in Norway, and from Wyoming’s Snake River cutthroats to Patagonia’s dry-fly-eating browns.

For best results, watch all videos at full-screen and in high definition. Remember, we surf so you don’t have to. But if you do stumble upon something great that you think is worthy of inclusion in a future F5, please post it in the comments below, and we’ll take a look.

And don’t forget to check out the awesome Orvis fly-fishing video theater: The Tug. As of today, there are exactly 1,429 great videos on the site!


We kick things off with the latest film from Black Fly Eyes, in which Nerijus and Vaidas get to do the best kind of research: seeing just how good the trout fishing is on a stretch of river in Norway.


We posted this remarkable trailer a couple years ago, but it just came up again and is worth posting a second time. The milkfish is a powerful but enigmatic quarry.


Our Québécois pals from Hooké love nothing better than traveling south to Patagonia to throw big dry flies to hungry trout.


This trailer clocks in at just 36 seconds, but it features some great visuals from Yellowstone, as well as the remarkable sax stylings of the inimitable Raphael Ravenscroft.


The Palena River or Carrenleufú, a river shared by Chile and Argentina in Northern Patagonia, looks gorgeous in this video. It’s big water, for sure.


The bonefish flats of New Caledonia, a French territory comprising dozens of islands in the South Pacific, is mostly self-shot but displays some bruiser bones.


I was unaware that Spain had such cool pike fishing until I saw this shortie from the northern part of the country.


This video is overly long, but it shows some really beautiful water and stunning fish from Iceland. The agony of the guide at 1:24 is something we’ve all felt.


Although we’ve featured videos including parrotfish, this might be the first focused exclusively on this odd saltwater species. Cool stuff!


Mossy Oak is not a brand name normally associated with fly fishing, but this video about one emloyee’s love of the sport is well done.

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