Friday Fly-Fishing Film Festival 11.22.19

Welcome to the another edition of the Orvis News Friday Fly-Fishing Film Festival! Each week, we scour the Web for the best fly-fishing videos available and then serve them up for you to enjoy. This week, we’ve got a cools dozen videos shot mostly in the U.S. and Australia, strangely enough. From the remote beaches of the York Peninsula to the chilly trout rivers of the Upper Peninsula, there’s plenty to keep the fly-fishing fires in your mind well stoked.

For best results, watch all videos at full-screen and in high definition. Remember, we surf so you don’t have to. But if you do stumble upon something great that you think is worthy of inclusion in a future F5, please post it in the comments below, and we’ll take a look.

This is the story of one year, fishing in 16 states and across Australia. Crikey.
Springtime in New Zealand looks like a lot of fun.
The waters off Long Island are a sport-fish racetrack during the fall.
Here’s a cool story about how two young men have bonded over their shared love of fly fishing.
These highlights of chasing steelhead will have you dreaming of chrome.
When you’re rigged for permit and a tarpon shows up, you take your shot knowing the fight won’t last long. Warning: Salty language.
Our colleague Joel Ruby shot this great promo for Falcon’s Ledge, in southeastern Utah.
I like it when someone tries to make a fly-fishing video that stands out from the rest. Some may feel that there are too many edits here, but the effort is impressive.
Chasing blue bastards in Australia is on the bucket list.
Yoopers are hardy folk, and they know how to catch trout in the snow.
The Boulder White Cloud Wilderness in Idaho offers solitude and gorgeous alpine fishing.
Finally, here’s a cool profile of Colorado guide Steve Baird, who talks about what it means to make fly fishing your life.

6 thoughts on “Friday Fly-Fishing Film Festival 11.22.19”

  1. On the film brotherhood. Good for you guys. Through your lives you will always have these memories and hopefully you will have many more fishing trips. Great film. Really enjoyed you two. Good luck and tight lines.

  2. After watching fishing videos for years I have to make a few comments on improving them.

    Keep footage of driving to a minimum. I know the videographer wants to tell a story but it could be just as effective by limiting the drive. I’ve seen videos that were 6-7 minutes long and the driving was 2 minutes.

    Keep the fast edits to a minimum. I believe when people watch a video they want to see something. Multiple fast edits over and over again are just flashes that the mind tries to comprehend. The most enjoyable videos have the last amount of fast edits.

    1. I agree with the driving bit, but different folks like different edits. Some like fast-paced edits others like yourself like slower-paced edits. I personally like both and would get bored if only one style persisted.

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