Master Class Monday: Nymphing without an Indicator


Written by: Tom Rosenbauer


In fly fishing, sometimes you need to be as stealthy as possible, especially when trout are visible in the water. In those situations when a strike indicator would spook trout, you need special techniques to catch them. This great video from Dave and Amelia Jensen, of Jensen Fly Fishing, shows you how to catch trout under difficult conditions. There is some amazing footage of huge trout taking nymphs in clear water, and it’s especially helpful to see the reaction of these fish as they move to an artificial fly.

Watch for further installments of Master Class Monday every week here at Orvis News, in the Advanced Tactics playlist our You Tube Channel, and on the new Advanced section (coming soon) of our Orvis Fly Fishing Learning Center.

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5 thoughts on “Master Class Monday: Nymphing without an Indicator

  1. Larry

    When I started nymphing back in early 70’s that is how most anglers “nymphed”, unless they fished “Brooks style”. The only “indicator in those days was the end of the floating fly line or a partially floatant-greased leader track to watch. Sight nymphing as shown in this video is especially fun and productive but only occurs the 10% of the time when light conditions, water clarity and fish depth allow. Searching the water for unseen fish can be done in the same way but indicators or sighters help the process of tracking the drift and seeing subtle takes. I quickly tripled my nymphing success and fun after learning to use sighters/indicators in the late 70’s but still enjoy going back to my roots when the sight-fishing situation warrants. Probably should add “Sight” to the front of the video title.

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  2. Tom Westcot

    I grew up fishing in Vermont using a single fly and hooking trout by sight or feel. Just watch the end of the line where the tippet is connected and feel for soft bumps by holding the line gingerly. Works like a champ. Oh, I have two Orvis rods. A 6.5′ bamboo gem from the 60’s and a new glass 8.5′. They are the best of my 10+ rods .

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