Photos: Banging on the Big Black Drum in Louisiana

Written by Lucas Bissett


Frank took this 29-pound tank after a very slow stalk.
Photo courtesy Lucas Bissett

Fishing for black drum is all about finding oysters. You find oysters and you find black drum. You have to fish slow, though: if you sit and wait for a few minutes when you get to your spot, you’ll see those tails start to pop up. Most of the time, these fish will muddy up the water when they are feeding, so it is imperative that you put the fly right on their head. Fish it really slow, letting the fly sink to the bottom, and then barely twitch it. Black drum aren’t nearly as aggressive as redfish, so be patient. As long as you are quiet. you will get multiple shots at these fish.

Capt. Lucas Bissett guides on the Louisiana Marsh. He’s based in Baton Rouge.


The author hoists a 36-pound beast.
Photo courtesy Lucas Bissett

You need to drop the cast right on the fish’s head, so it can see the fly.
Photo by Lucas Bissett

Houston was pretty proud of this one.
Photo by Lucas Bissett

It’s a slow game, but once you see the tails, you have a good chance of hooking up.
Photo by Lucas Bissett

3 thoughts on “Photos: Banging on the Big Black Drum in Louisiana”

  1. Pingback: Video: A Lousiana Redfish Guide's Day Off | Orvis News
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