Video: How to Rig Your Rod to Move to a New Fishing Spot

Written by: Peter Kutzer

Welcome to another installment of “Ask an Orvis Fly-Fishing Instructor,” with me, Peter Kutzer. In this episode, I demonstrate how to rig your rod when you want to move to a new fishing spot. Walking through the woods with a fly rod can be a dangerous proposition, and more than a few tips get broken this way.

The best way to rig the rod keeps your tippet from crimping, keeps the line-to-leader connection from getting stuck in the tip top, and lets you get back to fishing as quickly as possible. Good luck!

Previous episodes:

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor I: Casting Heavy Flies in the Wind

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor II: Roll-Casting for Accuracy & Distance

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor III: Casting in the Wind

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor IV: Casting Accuracy

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor V: The Curve Cast

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor VI: Casting Angles

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor VII: How to Double Haul

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor VIII: Fixing Tailing Loops

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor IX: How to Make Delicate Presentations

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor X: The Steeple Cast

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XI: How to Avoid Hitting Your Rod with Your Fly

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XII: Don’t be a Creep

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XIII: Parachute and Pile Casts

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XIV: How to Make a Reach Cast

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XV: How to Make a Tuck Cast

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XVI: How to Make an Aerial Mend

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XVII: How to Make Roll and Switch Casts with a Two-Handed Rod

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XVIII: The Basic Cast

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XIX: The Bow & Arrow Cast

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XX: The “Ready Position” and Fishing from a Boat

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XXI: The Basic Back Cast

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XXII: How to Add Distance to Your Cast

5 thoughts on “Video: How to Rig Your Rod to Move to a New Fishing Spot”

  1. Great tip with one exception – never walk with your rod pointing in front of you. You will break your tip quicker than anything if you snag a bush or trip. Seen my wife do it more than once.

    1. In some cases, the ability to thread your rod through branches and tree trunks makes the rod-forward approach the best option. That said, I usually do carry it pointing rearward. The problem there is that sometimes the line catches a branch. So there are positives and negatives to each way.

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