Videos: “Meet the Hendricksons” and Tie Two Great Patterns to Match Them


Hendrickson season will soon be upon us in the East and Midwest, so here are three great videos from the folks at Tightline Productions to help you get ready. First is some cool footage that Tim Flagler shot of Hendrickson nymphs in their natural environment. (There are some imitations of the nymph and emerger.) The emerging adult exhibits a dainty loveliness that might make you almost sad to see it eaten by a trout. Almost. And once those nymphs do hatch, you’ll need some dry flies to imitate them. Below are two such patterns from the mind of New Jersey author and blogger Matt Grobert.


Image by Tim Flagler, Tightline Productions

In the first, he shows you how to tie a traditional, Catskill-style pattern that, while perhaps not conforming to the strict standards of some Catskills aficionados, is sure to catch fish. The second is a Western-style Sparkle Dun, originated in West Yellowstone by Craig Mathews. The Sparkle Dun offers a very low profile, which can make a difference when the trout are being finicky. Tie up both, and you’ll be ready for the sippers and slurpers you encounter.


          Catskill-Style Hendrickson Dry Fly
          Hook: Standard dry-fly hook (here, a TMC 100), sizes 12-14.
          Thread: Olive, 6/0.
          Wing: Wood duck flank feather.
          Tail: Dark dun hackle fibers.
          Abdomen: Hendrickson Australian possum dubbing.
          Hackle: Dark dun.
          Head: Olive tying thread.
          Note: Change the colors and hook size to match other mayflies.


          Hendrickson Sparkle Dun
          Hook: Standard dry-fly hook (here, a Dai-Riki 305), sizes 12-16.
          Thread: Olive, 6/0.
          Wing: Light dun coastal deer hair, stacked and cleaned.
          Trailing shuck and wing flash: Brown Zelon.
          Abdomen and thorax: Blended rabbit fur—light tan, gray, and pink.
          Head: Olive tying thread.

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