Press Release: The Orvis Company Announces Winners of its Commitment to Protect Nature Grants for 2011

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Restoration of Montana’s Clark Fork is one of the projects receiving Orvis Company grant support in 2011

Manchester, VT- The Orvis Company announced today the winners of their Commitment to protect Nature Grants for 2011. Every year, Orvis reviews projects submitted from around the world. From those submissions Orvis chooses the best ones to share with their customers in matching grant campaigns in their catalogs and online. This year’s projects reach around the globe and include: Protection of the endangered black rhino of Zimbabwe and of the Coral Triangle fishery

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Northern New Mexico Snowpack Report

Cimarron River Snowing

Although the media has been focusing on drought in the Southwest, the snowpack in the mountains above Taos is looking good for the spring season.

 photo by Doc Thompson

[Editor’s note: Here’s a snowpack update from Doc Thompson, owner of High Country Anglers.]

The media throughout the Southwest is working hard to paint a doom-n-gloom picture of a bone-dry New Mexico. I have an issue with this, since they forgot to look into what’s going on in the northern part of the state, particularly the Taos area. Yesterday I had 4 to 5 inches of fresh snow, and it continued to snow throughout the day. Here is a picture I took yesterday morning along the Cimarron. The Cimarron Watershed snowpack is only 9% below average, and some of our other high-mountain. . .

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Tuesday Tip: The Basic Cast


Truel casting

 Orvis head instructor Truel Myers.


[Editor’s note: Over the next couple of weeks, Truel Myers, head instructor at the Orvis Fly-Fishing Schools, will walk us through The Orvis Progressive Method to Fly Casting. This is the teaching methodology used at all Orvis fly-fishing schools, and it’s designed on a building-blocks approach that begins with the most basic mechanics of the cast and moves toward the double haul.]

Step 1. The Basic (Pick-up and Lay-Down) Casting Stroke

This is the simplest way to learn the proper mechanics for the casting stroke. You are not trying to keep the line in the air or work line out through the guides. Instead, you are going to start and end with. . .

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Gibson’s First Herding Lesson

Gibson just can’t sit still in a car. He’s well behaved enough, but the entire ride to anywhere he will stand, pace, stare out the window, bark at motorcycles and paw the dashboard. He has this bit where he puts both front paws on the dash and uses the passenger seat for his back feet, suspending himself in mid-air above the truck’s bench, using it as leverage to make his teenage body as long as possible. Sometimes he moves over to me and sits aside me, my arm around him, and I feel like a character in a Norman Rockwell oils. But usually he just scatters about. He summons enough static electricity to shock me when his nose touches my cheek. His body is literally a live wire, excited to be let out for the next adventure.

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Why I Love Grouse: A Walk in the Vermont Woods

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Grouse Cover
Scott McEnaney

Ruffed grouse always make me smile, sometimes it is when I have watched my spaniels change as they get a snoot full of scent and the bird flushes, sometimes its when I get lucky and actually connect with one, and most times it is when they fly away from the pattern of my 20 bore and live to see another day.

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Accidental Salmon

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The author’s brother working a streamer deep and slow. Note how he keeps the rod tip 
low to ensure there’s no slack and he has constant contact with the fly.

 photo by Drew Price


Freezing rain. That was the initial forecast for early Saturday morning. I thought it could be the end of this early-season trip in search of a pike or two. My brother Pete and a few other friends had told me about a spot with some decent pike during the winter. I have been dying to get into a water wolf, since it has been since October since I last landed one. I know that the season is coming up quickly, but it is never too early to have a pike on the end of a fly line. My buddy Kevin was concerned about. . . 

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Tropical Dreams Redux

Today’s the day it finally hit me: I’m sick of winter. With a foot of snow still on the ground and tomorrow’s high expected to be in the teens, fishing season still seems a long way off. Feeling sorry. . .

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Murph Training, VI: Murph Heels

Now we’re getting down to business. This is at once the most boring time, but the most critical time for solidifying Murph’s foundation that will be the basis for everything he accomplishes in his life.

Because it is so much fun to see your young dog do and achieve new things, the tendency is to push them by adding new commands on top of the ones you’ve recently taught. The danger to this is not locking in the foundation; or “building your house on sand,” to turn a biblical phrase. Unless the foundation is rock solid, the resulting structure will be flawed. Okay enough with the metaphors.

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Podcast- The Laryngitis Largemouth Bass and Panfish Episode

Tom talks a lot, and it finally caught up with him He has a bit of larygitis this week, but takes one for the team and answers a phone request for a largemouth bass episode.

In the fly box: Do fish see color? We also take a phone request for a series on fishing different regions of the United States and beyond.

Did he leave anything out? Have a sugestion for a future podcast? Call us at (802) 362-8800 or leave us a comment below!

Click the play button below to listen to this episode. Go to orvis.com/podcast to subscribe to future episodes


If you cannot see the podcast player, please click this link to listen.

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