The Orvis Fly Fishing Guide Podcast- The First Thirty Feet

Casting out that first thirty feet of line can sometimes be tricky. Tom has some easy-to-follow tips from for the advanced and beginner angler alike. Take a listen and learn to false cast less and fish more.

Tom also asks if you would like to hear some more advanced, “black diamond” podcasts. Let us know in the comments.

Click the play button below to listen to this episode. Go to orvis.com/podcast to subscribe to future episodes


If you cannot see the podcast player, please click this link to listen.

Read More

Picking up My New Pup, Murph: Part II

It was exactly 2, 962 miles round trip to get Murph and he is worth every mile of it. It was a great seven days with my son Nick, road tripping through the South. I was born and raised there. Nick was born and raised in Vermont and introducing him to southern staples like pork cracklins and moon pies just made it better.

The first three days we hunted quail at Harris Springs (you can see the video in the hunting section), we shucked and ate roasted oysters South Carolina, went to Bass Pro in Charlotte, North Carolina, where I discovered to my chagrin I didn’t need anything, visited a friend of mine in Athens, Georgia who lives on a lake and watched geese and mallards drop in front of the rising sun, ate our fill of Waffle House breakfasts, spent the night near Elvis’ birthplace in Tupelo, Mississippi, and ultimately ended up in Oxford, Mississippi and Wildrose Kennels.It was exactly 2, 962 miles round trip to get Murph and he is worth every mile of it. It was a great seven days with my son Nick, road tripping through the South. I was born and raised there. Nick was born and raised in Vermont and introducing him to southern staples like pork cracklins and moon pies just made it better.

The first three days we hunted quail at Harris Springs (you can see the video in the hunting section), we shucked and ate roasted oysters South Carolina, went to Bass Pro in Charlotte, North Carolina, where I discovered to my chagrin I didn’t need anything, visited a friend of mine in Athens, Georgia who lives on a lake and watched geese and mallards drop in front of the rising sun, ate our fill of Waffle House breakfasts, spent the night near Elvis’ birthplace in Tupelo, Mississippi, and ultimately ended up in Oxford, Mississippi and Wildrose Kennels.

Read More

Fly Fishing 101 at the Denver ISE Show This Weekend!

FF101

Come learn how to cast—or to fine-tune your skills—at the Orvis Fly Fishing 101 booth, which is part of the Denver ISE show this weekend

REMINDER: If you’re in the Denver area this week, swing by the Orvis booth (# R557) at the International Sportsman’s Show at the Denver Convention Center. If you think you can make it, here’s a coupon for two dollars off the admission price.

Come take advantage of our free fly-casting and fishing lessons—a program called Fly Fishing 101, which is a fun, quick class for anyone who would like to learn how to get started in the awesome sport of fly fishing. Those who participate will not only learn the very basics to fly casting, but they will also receive some Orvis swag and a coupon for $25 off a $50 purchase. We’ll also point you in the right direction to those who can help you further your education.  
 
We will have some fun casting games in (or near) the booth to play with and some additional Orvis product coupons you. . .

Read More

Steelhead Odyssey, Episodes III-V

IMG_2420

Ted Morris is all smiles as he shows off his first steelhead, taken from Idaho’s Little Salmon.

photo by Eric Strader

[Editor’s Note: This month, three trout guides from Hubbard’s Yellowstone Lodge have embarked on a steelhead trip through Idaho, Washington, and Oregon. They’ll be filing frequent updates on their progress. The anglers—all steelhead novices—are Eric Strader (from Missouri), Robert McCallister (from New Mexico), and Ted Morris (from Pennsylvania).]

Ted and I stayed in the camper for Christmas, because Robert went back to New Mexico for Christmas. We found a good campground called 3 Rivers near the Bogachiel and the Calawah rivers. Our plan was that we would be able to walk to three good fishing spots that were fairly close. Well…it rained the entire time Robert was gone, and all the rivers. . .

Read More

Protect Nature: Take a Kid Fishing

All sportsmen and women understand their obligation to conservation—without the resource, we have nothing. Many great organizations operate around the globe working hard to serve the species, habitats and ecosystems that need our immediate attention. To do our part, we find a compelling effort, and if possible, give them our time, money, sweat, endorsement, or whatever we can afford. Flip through the Orvis catalog or browse the website and you’ll find a handful of environmental projects well worth backing.

Read More

Big Oil Wins First “Big Haul” Battle

The attorney appointed by the Idaho Transportation Department to hear arguments against allowing “mega-load shipments” of oversize refinery equipment over highways through some scenic valleys along the Clearwater and Lochsa rivers has recommended that permits for four such shipments be issued to ConocoPhillips. Attorney Merlyn Clark said that he believes the loads can be transported safely and with “minimum inconvenience to the general public.” Opponents had argued. . .

Read More

In the Loop 01.03.11

Arnold Richardson

Arnold Richardson, who portrayed the elderly Norman Maclean in the final scene of 
“A River Runs Through It,” passed away last month at the age of 96.

photo courtesy Sony Pictures

Although everyone remembers Brad Pitt and Craig Sheffer as the stars of Robert Redford’s “A River Runs through It,” the image viewers are left with at the end of the film is the elderly Norman Maclean fishing alone on a Montana river as Redford reads the classic final lines of the book. Last month, Arnold Richardson, the actor who portrayed the older Maclean. . .

Read More

Finding a Cure for Canine Heart Disease

Orvis Cover Dog Contest - Rocky & Rico
Veterinary student Eva Oxford usually spends most of her nights and weekends in the lab at Cornell University trying to unravel the mystery of heart disease in boxers.

In 2004, Oxford was studying for a PhD at SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, where she was pursuing a career in human biomedical research. Her career track changed when her adviser’s boxer became ill with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), an inherited disease that causes arrhythmia, heart failure and death. That’s when Oxford met Dr. Sydney Moïse, a veterinary cardiologist at Cornell University who is funded by Morris Animal Foundation.

Read More