The Shucked Up Emerger

Shucked Up Emerger from Richard Strolis on Vimeo.

Back in February, we featured a Blue-winged Olive Thorax pattern from Connecticut-based guide Rich Strolis, and here’s a great emerger pattern to go with it. Blue-winged olives are among the most important insects in early spring out West, often hatching on overcast days or even during snow squalls. In the video, Rich says the fly is so effective he’s even a little hesitant to share his recipe, but I guess he can’t help himself…which helps us.

Read More

Murph Training XI: Murph’s Getting Steady

Murph Steady

Murph sitting steady while the author tosses dummies and tennis balls around him.

photo by Tim Bronson

A couple of weeks ago I talked about Murph and putting his steadiness to sit and heel together on a single blind retrieve. Over the course of the last few days, I’ve been continually working Murph on his steadiness in every possible situation, but I want him to begin to understand what he’s here for. As I said before, at this point I don’t want to give him a bunch of retrieves for two reasons. One, his teeth are changing over, and two, I don’t want to get him hyped up on retrieving like I did with Pickett.

Read More

Tuesday Tip: Which One Fly Rod Should I Bring?

Linehan

Summertime on the Kootenai calls for a fast-action 5-weight to beat the wind.

photo by Tim Linehan

If you only want to bring one rod on your upcoming trip to the Rocky Mountains the first thing to consider is what time of year you’ll be traveling.

During the early season in the Rockies, water conditions and weather can vary greatly from day to day, so versatility is most important when you’re considering rod weight. For this reason alone, a relatively stiff 6-weight is your best bet and will cover all bases and handle most techniques from deep-water nymphing with weight and indicators to streamers or early season dry-fly fishing. And it’s not. . .

Read More

In the Loop 04.18.11

Finding new waters to fish is a lifelong quest for most fly fishermen, who dream of secluded, “secret” spots where they can escape the crowds and find eager, unpressured trout. One way to strike out on your own is by “bluelining,” or poring over maps to find small streams off the beaten path. On Midcurrent.com, my friend Brandt Oswald–a Livingston, Montana-based guide…

Read More

Friday Film Festival 04.15.11

Film Festival2

Welcome to another edition of the OrvisNews.com Friday Film Festival, in which we scour the Internets for the best fly-fishing footage available. This week we’ve got a good mix of fresh and salt, exotic and down-home, as well as professional and do-it-yourself filmmaking. You might even learn some Swedish. Enjoy!

Read More

That Darned Rabbit: Great Video Tips for Shooting Rabbit Clays

We clays shooters all know that rabbit clay station all too well; it’s fun but suddenly we feel all bets are off. The rascally thing bounces and jounces across the ground so fast and frenzied and unpredictably, it can leave us scratching our heads. And missing. Here is a short video on how to shoot rabbit clays with more success.

Read More

Trout Bum of the Week: Bryan Eldredge

Bryan Eldredge

Bryan Eldredge with a gorgeous Utah brown trout.

Welcome to our second “Trout Bum of the Week” post, in which we’ll highlight one of the guys living the good life…of a sort. Most of them are guides who have turned their passion into a vocation, spending their time in an outdoor “office” that may include a drift boat, gorgeous mountain scenery, and crystal clear water. Others do have day jobs but manage to spend every other available minute on the water with a fly rod in hand. Whether you aspire to one lifestyle of the other, it’s illuminating to explore the different paths these men and women have taken on their way to achieving “trout bum” status. Plus, if you leave a comment below the post, you can qualify to win a FREE shirt from our new Trout Bum Collection.

Read More

The Waiting is the Hardest Part

bkill

Sure, fishing season is open, but runoff is in full swing here in the Battenkill Valley. I consider the ‘Kill fishable when the Battenville gauge (which is quite a way downstream from us) reads below 1,200cfs, but springtime streamer action is best at 900cfs. As you can see, the river is churning along at almost 3,000cfs, which means that it’s in the trees in many places. Grrr. How’s your local water doing?

Read More