Trout Bum of the Week: David Meador

David Meador has been fly fishing since 1978, getting started back in his home state of Virginia. But like most die-hard trout bums, he could not resist the pull of the West and the lure of the fly-fishing life. As a guide at PRO Outfitters in Helena, Montana, he gets to fish some of the most fabled rivers of Big Sky Country: the Missouri, the Blackfoot, and the Smith.

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Getting Furry

Marmot

The yellow-bellied marmot: fly fishing’s next frontier?

photo via Wikipedia

One of my favorite Paul Schullery articles about fly-fishing history is about anglers catching things other than fish. The most common “collateral catches” are, of course, bats and birds, and Izaak Walton described how Italian anglers used to catch martins and swallows for meat. But Schullery’s column goes on to describe a hilarious story in which Rudyard Kipling accidentally hooked a cow.

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The Shucked Up Emerger

Shucked Up Emerger from Richard Strolis on Vimeo.

Back in February, we featured a Blue-winged Olive Thorax pattern from Connecticut-based guide Rich Strolis, and here’s a great emerger pattern to go with it. Blue-winged olives are among the most important insects in early spring out West, often hatching on overcast days or even during snow squalls. In the video, Rich says the fly is so effective he’s even a little hesitant to share his recipe, but I guess he can’t help himself…which helps us.

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Murph Training XI: Murph’s Getting Steady

Murph Steady

Murph sitting steady while the author tosses dummies and tennis balls around him.

photo by Tim Bronson

A couple of weeks ago I talked about Murph and putting his steadiness to sit and heel together on a single blind retrieve. Over the course of the last few days, I’ve been continually working Murph on his steadiness in every possible situation, but I want him to begin to understand what he’s here for. As I said before, at this point I don’t want to give him a bunch of retrieves for two reasons. One, his teeth are changing over, and two, I don’t want to get him hyped up on retrieving like I did with Pickett.

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Tuesday Tip: Which One Fly Rod Should I Bring?

Linehan

Summertime on the Kootenai calls for a fast-action 5-weight to beat the wind.

photo by Tim Linehan

If you only want to bring one rod on your upcoming trip to the Rocky Mountains the first thing to consider is what time of year you’ll be traveling.

During the early season in the Rockies, water conditions and weather can vary greatly from day to day, so versatility is most important when you’re considering rod weight. For this reason alone, a relatively stiff 6-weight is your best bet and will cover all bases and handle most techniques from deep-water nymphing with weight and indicators to streamers or early season dry-fly fishing. And it’s not. . .

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In the Loop 04.18.11

Finding new waters to fish is a lifelong quest for most fly fishermen, who dream of secluded, “secret” spots where they can escape the crowds and find eager, unpressured trout. One way to strike out on your own is by “bluelining,” or poring over maps to find small streams off the beaten path. On Midcurrent.com, my friend Brandt Oswald–a Livingston, Montana-based guide…

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Friday Film Festival 04.15.11

Film Festival2

Welcome to another edition of the OrvisNews.com Friday Film Festival, in which we scour the Internets for the best fly-fishing footage available. This week we’ve got a good mix of fresh and salt, exotic and down-home, as well as professional and do-it-yourself filmmaking. You might even learn some Swedish. Enjoy!

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That Darned Rabbit: Great Video Tips for Shooting Rabbit Clays

We clays shooters all know that rabbit clay station all too well; it’s fun but suddenly we feel all bets are off. The rascally thing bounces and jounces across the ground so fast and frenzied and unpredictably, it can leave us scratching our heads. And missing. Here is a short video on how to shoot rabbit clays with more success.

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