Video: How to Tie Mathews’s Zelon Midge

Craig Mathews should require no introduction. He has been a fixture in the fly-fishing world since 1982, from his base at Blue Ribbon Flies in West Yellowstone, Montana. His incredible patterns—such as the. . .

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Video: How to Tie the Mercury Midge

Although most anglers think of midge hatches as winter phenomena, these tiny insects hatch year-round in most places. (In fact, some stillwater anglers focus on midges almost exclusively throughout the season.) Winter anglers love midges best because Chironomids are often the only hatches that bring fish to the surface during the coldest months. (See yesterday’s. . .

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Video: How to Tie the Copper Zebra Midge

Midges are great patterns year-round, but they can be particularly useful in winter, when there’s so little other insect activity going on. Midge patterns are usually quite simple, partly because working with tiny hooks can be tough, especially for the sausage-fingered among us. So at first glance, the Copper Zebra Midge looks like a nightmare because it has so many features, such as. . .

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Video: How to Tie the Pumpkin Head Midge

Last week, we featured a simple, diminutive midge pattern, so I figured we’d with go with something a little more garish this week. The Pumpkin Head Midge combines a dark body with a fluorescent-orange head—hardly mimicking the natural—to create something that’s both eye-catching and “buggy.” I know first-hand the power of fluorescent orange. When my friend Joe Phillips introduced me to. . .

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Video: How to Tie the Serendipity Midge

The Serendipity is a variation on the British Buzzer midge patterns that have been around forever. This modern American version is credited to the late Madison River guide Russ Marigold, who showed the fly to Craig Mathews—owner of Blue Ribbon Flies in West Yellowstone, Montana—in 1988. Marifold’s original had a smooth floss body of brown or olive, wrapped with a gold wire rib. He later. . .

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Video: How to Tie the Forget-Me-Knot Midge

Unlike many trout-food insects, which are available to trout only during very specific times of year, midges hatch year-round on most waters. You know those times when you can see fish rising but you can’t find anything on the water? It’s probably midges or midge pupae that are on the menu. That means it’s time to tie on the 7X and a minuscule fly that you can barely see. There are lots of great midge patterns out. . .

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Video: How to Tie the RS2 Midge/Emerger

The RS2 pattern was developed more than 30 years ago by Colorado angler and tier Rim Chung. The name of the fly is short for “Rim’s Semblance 2,” and it fishes well as both a midge or a mayfly emerger. The original version featured natural beaver fur dubbing and saddle hackle for the wing. Many more modern versions, such as the one shown here, feature different. . .

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Video: How to Tie the Pumpkin Head Midge

Last week, we featured a muted, imitative midge pattern, so I figured we’d with go with something a little more garish. this week. The Pumpkin Head Midge combines a dark body with a fluorescent-orange head—hardly mimicking the natural—to create something that’s both eye-catching and “buggy.” I know first-hand the power of fluorescent orange. When my friend Joe Phillips introduced me to. . .

Read More

Video: How to Tie a Mercury Midge

Although most anglers think of midge hatches as winter phenomena, these tiny insects hatch year-round in most places. (In fact, some stillwater anglers focus on midges almost exclusively throughout the season.) However, winter anglers love midges best because Chironomids are often the only hatches that bring fish to the surface during the coldest months, and a Griffith’s Gnat cast to sipping. . .

Read More