Wednesday Wake-Up Call 08.07.19: Pebble Mine Edition

Last week, the Environmental Protection Agency announced that it was withdrawing the 2014 Proposed Determination, which ” would have safeguarded Bristol Bay from the proposed Pebble mine and other large-scale industrial development by . . .

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Story: “Getting The Big Picture” on an Alaskan Stream

Written by: Bob Triggs, Washington Fly Fishing


The author (left) shows of a Lower Talarik Creek rainbow landed by angler Bob Kuhn.
Photo courtesy Bob Kuhn

The DeHavilland Beaver lifted off of the quiet lake surface at dawn, leaving a trail of water sluicing off of the trailing edges of the floats. I was being sent out, with the float plane and pilot, and . . .

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What’s in the Pebble Mine Plan That’s So Troubling?

Berkeley Pit in Butte, Montana. This is significantly smaller than the tailings pond proposed at Pebble, which would sit at the headwaters of Bristol Bay.

News that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has released its Draft Environmental Impact Statement relating to the proposed Pebble Mine raises the important question “Why are we so opposed to the plan?” In a great article from Save Bristol Bay . . .

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#MomentofChill 11.27.18: Save Bristol Bay!

The rivers of Alaska’s Bristol Bay are home to the world’s largest runs of sockeye salmon, like those shown here beneath the falls on the Copper River. Near the headwaters of this incredible resource, a Canadian mining company has proposed an . . .

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Classic Story: Patience Pays Off in Alaska


The huge rainbows that Alaska is famous for are not always easy to catch.
All photos by Jeremy Kehrein

In early July 1995, I was guiding two of my favorite clients of all time—a father-and-son team from Annapolis, Maryland—on the Copper River, which drains into Alaska’s Lake Iliamna. Tom and. . .

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Photos and Story: A DIY Trip for Alaskan Chrome


The author fulfilled his Alaskan dream with a little help from his Instagram friends.
Photos by Mario Guel

Since I was a child, I have dreamed of visiting Alaska. When I was six years old, in 1986, I played a video game called, “King Salmon,” in which you’d troll on the Kenai River and catch giant king salmon—some over 100 pounds! I loved it. Then in . . .

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