Which Large Dog Breeds Are Most Sensitive to the Cold?


Some dogs, such as Fletcher, love the snow, but not all breeds do well in the cold.
Photo by Maren, Richmond

Just because your dog has a lot of mass, doesn’t mean they run warm. When the temperatures drop, some bigger dogs may prefer hanging out inside and even worse, the cold can be dangerous for them. Among large dog breeds who are sensitive to cold, Great Danes, Mastiffs, Dobermans, German Shorthaired Pointers, and Boxers stand out as giants that you might not expect would be averse to chilly temperatures. While some big breeds may surprise you, others that don’t like the cold may be more obvious. Let’s take a look at why these dog breeds balk at cold-weather walks and why…

Read More

Are Dog Beds Necessary?


Photos via orvis.com

If you’re wondering whether your dog needs a bed, ponder this: The average dog stands up on his feet for only five hours per day. If you’re a dog parent, you know what they’re doing the rest of the time—it’s enough to make sleep-deprived humans envious. Dogs spend between 12 and 14 hours per every 24 hours sleeping. Tag on another five to seven hours lying around awake but resting, and the answer comes clear. Yes, your dog needs a soft, supportive bed—both for sleeping and lounging. From offering extra support for his joints to providing a dedicated place that’s all his, here are the primary ways a dog bed benefits your best friend:

Read More

What to Put in Your Hunting Dog First Aid Kit


Snake bite wound after debriding is gruesome but will heal.
Photos courtesy  Greystone Castle

You take every precaution to prevent injuries when you go wingshooting, waterfowl hunting, hiking, or when you embark on a training session with your dog. Though he’s steady to shot without fail, and you’ve outfitted him with a safety vest and locator bell, there’s always a risk of accidents in the field. Your dog can have a run-in with a porcupine and walk away with a snout full of quills, or encounter a venomous snake. Branches can lash him in the eye, or briars can lacerate his legs or paws. Because of these common dangers, it’s important you carry a well-stocked first aid kit for your dog each time you head out…

Read More

How to Clean a Dog Collar

Dogs love mud, and they end up soiling their collars, as well as themselves.
Photo by Jody, Stevenson

No matter how clean your dog stays or how fresh his coat, the collar he wears will eventually absorb enough skin oils, dirt, and grime to develop an odor. Dogs who spend a lot of time outdoors rolling in the mud, swimming in lakes and streams, chasing balls, or playing at the dog park are more prone to collar funk than the small lap dog who rarely ventures out and takes a weekly trip to the doggie salon. But eventually, all collars will need to be washed to keep them smelling nice—and to prevent unhygienic bacteria buildup.

Read More

Are You Ready for a Dog? A Guide for First-Time Dog Owners


A dog is a wonderful addition to a household, but everyone must be ready for the responsibility.
Photo by Carol, Cleveland

You love dogs and are contemplating taking the leap into dog ownership. We get it! Having a dog is truly one of life’s great joys. But caring for a dog full-time is also a serious . . .

Read More

How to Protect Your Dog in the Snow and Ice

Logan enjoys deep snow on a sunny day.
Photo by Tom, Arlington


What self-respecting dog can resist playing outside in a fresh blanket of snow? Most dogs romp in it with unbridled joy. But winter brings seasonal hazards for your dog, including salt and other de-icing agents, dangerously cold temperatures, deep snow, slippery ice, and more. If heavy snowfall is the norm where you live, you and your dog will have no choice but to spend at least some time in it, even if he’d rather be curled up at your feet in front of the fireplace. 

Read More

Rethinking Dogs as Holiday Gifts: What You Should Know

While dogs can make wonderful presents, there are potential problems, as well.
Photo by Jill, Oconomowoc

While conventional wisdom suggests giving a dog as a Christmas present is ill advised, a new way of thinking is gaining momentum, supported by research that suggests a puppy-as-present may not only be okay, but could ultimately help more shelter dogs find forever homes. Does a dog make a good present? If you’re thinking of giving a puppy or a dog to a child or other beloved family member or friend this holiday season, here are some compelling findings that might make you smile.

Read More