When Will My Dog Stop Growing?

Like people, dogs grow on their own schedules. Each dog’s schedule is determined by his genetics, health, and nutrition. A pup destined to be small might be done at 6 months, while a large dog might grow for two years. And some dog parts grow (or regrow) throughout a dog’s lifetime.

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How to Stop Your Dog From Barking

Gus gets his bark on.
Photo by Gregory, Pittsburgh

To reduce your dog’s barking, you must first pinpoint what sets him off and tailor your behavior training to his triggers. His barking is instinctual. But constant barking is intolerable for you and the rest of his human family. Let the barking continue for too long unabated, and you may face discontented neighbors who are suffering along with you. Read on to learn the common causes of excessive barking; how much barking is acceptable; and most importantly, how to curtail incessant barking, day or night. We’ll also give you a rundown of which dog breeds bark the most—and the least.

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Which human foods can dogs eat?

Offering a bit of a burger at a summer cookout or a nibble of a holiday cookie may seem harmless, but are these ‘people’ foods dangerous for dogs? We’ve explored 100 foods to discover which are good, bad, or even toxic for dogs. A properly balanced . . .

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What to Do With a Stray Dog

Meeting a stray dog brings you to a crossroads of sorts. The choices you make in the next few minutes, days, and weeks could be no less than life changing—for you and the wayward furry fellow.

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How to Check Your Dog for Dehydration and Other Canine Water Tips


Indoor/Outdoor Water Bowl
Photo via orvis.com

Summer brings with it opportunities for joyous time outdoors with your beloved family members, including your dog. Hopefully, during these lively adventures, your furry, four-legged friend makes frequent pit stops at her water bowl, because without enough water, she’s at risk of dehydration. The condition can vary from mild to severe, at which point it’s a medical emergency—her organs can shut down without immediate treatment.

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How to Exercise Your Dog Inside

It’s possible to exercise your dog inside—even in an apartment—if you remember you can work his body, brain, and nose.

All three types of exercise are useful: A good bout of physical exercise tires muscles and fires endorphins. Exercise the body whenever possible, and your dog will thank you. But if your dog is recovering from surgery, suffering from arthritis, or otherwise can’t get in his workout, don’t despair. Working his brain will also wear him out, and you can have plenty of fun doing it. Finally, nose work is often right in a dog’s area of expertise. If your dog’s hobbies include sniffing, let him stay busy doing what he loves.

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Why Does a Wet Dog Smell Bad—And What Can I Do About It?

Photo by Roberto Nickson from Pexels

The secret to the wet-dog smell is the microorganisms (little yeast and bacteria) that live on your dog’s skin.

On a healthy dog, the microorganisms are nothing to worry about. All dogs have ’em. But as they go about their normal lives, these micro-critters produce, ahem, micro-excreta. Yep: teensy little yeast poops—molecules that scientists call volatile organic compounds.

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When Is It Time to Surrender Your Dog?

Samson, the giant Great Dane-Newfoundland crossbreed said to be Britain’s
biggest dog, needs surgery on his injured foot, but his owners are on fixed
incomes. Does this make them unfit to keep Samson?
photo via the Daily mail

You want only the best for your best friend—always. But what happens when the best thing for your dog is parting ways with you? The choice to surrender a dog isn’t an easy one and should never be taken lightly. Often it’s heart-wrenching. But in certain circumstances, it’s the right call.

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How to Treat Heat Stroke (Hyperthermia) In Dogs

Heat Stroke is a medical emergency for dogs, requiring immediate interventions to lower an affected dog’s body temperature, including moving him to the shade, offering fresh water to drink, and sprinkling him with cool (never cold!) water. . . .

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