How Far Can My Dog Hike?

Hiking with your dog can be incredibly rewarding, creating a deeper bond between you.
Photo by: Cindy Dunican

How far your dog can hike will vary significantly based on multiple factors, including her age, breed, and fitness level, as well as the length and difficulty of the hike. The easy trail at your local nature center is a far cry from hiking a 14er—a mountain with a peak above 14,000 feet. If you’re considering adding regular treks with your dog to your outdoor adventures, research, preparation, and training are critical before hitting the trail.

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Video: Why a Dog Bed?

A dog bed is more than just a comfortable place for your best friend to sleep. It’s a place of refuge, a place to recover after activity, and a training tool. Every dog needs a “den,” where they can get away from life’s . . .

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Which human foods can dogs eat?

Offering a bit of a burger at a summer cookout or a nibble of a holiday cookie may seem harmless, but are these ‘people’ foods dangerous for dogs? We’ve explored 100 foods to discover which are good, bad, or even toxic for dogs. A properly balanced . . .

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How to Check Your Dog for Dehydration and Other Canine Water Tips


Indoor/Outdoor Water Bowl
Photo via orvis.com

Summer brings with it opportunities for joyous time outdoors with your beloved family members, including your dog. Hopefully, during these lively adventures, your furry, four-legged friend makes frequent pit stops at her water bowl, because without enough water, she’s at risk of dehydration. The condition can vary from mild to severe, at which point it’s a medical emergency—her organs can shut down without immediate treatment.

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How to Exercise Your Dog Inside

It’s possible to exercise your dog inside—even in an apartment—if you remember you can work his body, brain, and nose.

All three types of exercise are useful: A good bout of physical exercise tires muscles and fires endorphins. Exercise the body whenever possible, and your dog will thank you. But if your dog is recovering from surgery, suffering from arthritis, or otherwise can’t get in his workout, don’t despair. Working his brain will also wear him out, and you can have plenty of fun doing it. Finally, nose work is often right in a dog’s area of expertise. If your dog’s hobbies include sniffing, let him stay busy doing what he loves.

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Why Does a Wet Dog Smell Bad—And What Can I Do About It?

Photo by Roberto Nickson from Pexels

The secret to the wet-dog smell is the microorganisms (little yeast and bacteria) that live on your dog’s skin.

On a healthy dog, the microorganisms are nothing to worry about. All dogs have ’em. But as they go about their normal lives, these micro-critters produce, ahem, micro-excreta. Yep: teensy little yeast poops—molecules that scientists call volatile organic compounds.

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When Is It Time to Surrender Your Dog?

Samson, the giant Great Dane-Newfoundland crossbreed said to be Britain’s
biggest dog, needs surgery on his injured foot, but his owners are on fixed
incomes. Does this make them unfit to keep Samson?
photo via the Daily mail

You want only the best for your best friend—always. But what happens when the best thing for your dog is parting ways with you? The choice to surrender a dog isn’t an easy one and should never be taken lightly. Often it’s heart-wrenching. But in certain circumstances, it’s the right call.

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How to Treat Heat Stroke (Hyperthermia) In Dogs

Heat Stroke is a medical emergency for dogs, requiring immediate interventions to lower an affected dog’s body temperature, including moving him to the shade, offering fresh water to drink, and sprinkling him with cool (never cold!) water. . . .

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Common Hazards for Dogs Around the House

What do dish detergent, raisins, chocolate, and mothballs have in common? They’re all hazardous for dogs—and they exist in many households. Of the many responsibilities that come with owning a dog, protecting him from dangerous foods, cleaning supplies, and other toxins should be a priority. To keep your dog safe, know where the household toxins are stored, and take steps to keep these hazards out of your dog’s paw and jaw reach.

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