Can You Train Old Dogs?


Make sure you give your older dog time to rest and recoup.
Photo via orvis.com

You can indeed train old dogs, and there are good reasons to make obedience training a lifelong endeavor. After adopting a senior dog, for example, you may discover her previous owners weren’t particular about leash training only after she drags you around the neighborhood on walks. Or, your older dog simply needs a refresher course in Obedience 101. Plus, training old dogs is good for them. It offers critical mental stimulation that can delay cognitive decline in senior dogs, and helps prevent obesity by keeping them physically active.

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A Personalized Dog Collar: The Best Way to Find a Lost Dog

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Teddy Blue and Maggie
Photo courtesy of Deb German

The single best way to find your lost dog is to outfit her in a personalized dog collar, embroidered or engraved with your phone number, before she goes missing. The reason is simple: the person who finds her is most likely to check her collar or tags first, and call the number on them before making ‘found dog’ posters or fliers, or dropping her at the local animal shelter. That one phone call will lead a good Samaritan instead directly to you, and hopefully your pal will be back in your arms again in short order. A redundant system is better still—adding ID hang tags to your dog’s collar and having her microchipped are smart backups.

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What Is Pododermatitis in Dogs?


Pododermatitis is an inflammation that can be caused by many disorders including infections, allergies,
hormonal disorders, immune-mediated diseases, tumors or cancers and environmental contaminants.
Photo by Caroldermoid, used via  Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license  

As awful as it sounds, canine pododermatitis is not a disease, but a condition caused by any one or more of a multitude of underlying problems—think of it as a catch-all term to describe an . . .

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Common Dog Paw Problems And How to Prevent Them

By: Orvis Staff

Cooper may not enjoy having his paws checked, but the health of the pads is important.

Photo by: Phil Monahan

Don’t underestimate the importance of dog paw care. Consider this: especially if he’s a working or a sporting breed, your dog’s feet have an important job to do—same as your own feet. His fleshy foot pads give him extra shock-absorbing cushioning to protect his bones and joints, they help insulate him against extreme weather, safeguard him against rough ground, and protect other soft tissue inside his paws. But they’re not made of cast iron: the pads and the skin between your doggie’s toes, and his toenails, are fairly susceptible to injuries. How best to prevent or treat common dog paw problems? In a nutshell, it depends on what potentially causes them. Read on to learn about the most common dog paw and paw pad injuries, and how to treat and prevent them.

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Dog-Safe Garden Pest Control

By: Orvis Staff


A nice lawn may look good, but the chemicals required might not be safe for your dog.
Photo by: Meredith, Atlanta

A backyard is a dog’s outdoor kingdom, and he surveys every inch of it every day. There are always new scents to investigate, shrubs to mark, and maybe even some grass to eat. Because he . . .

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Protecting Your Lawn From Dog Urine

By: Orvis Staff


If you love dogs and having a lovely lawn, this can be a problem.
Photo by Mike Finkelstein

The good of owning a dog far outweighs the bad, but—if we’re being honest—there are a few downsides. One of the more vexing problems that come part and parcel with your best friend is lawn burn—those unsightly brown spots spread across your lawn, caused by your dog’s urine. Your dog’s gotta go, of course, but lawn burn isn’t as inevitable as your best friend’s bodily functions. Read on to learn what causes lawn burn, and the simple steps you can take to prevent it so you can enjoy an uninterrupted expanse of fresh, emerald-green grass.

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Can Dogs Get Bed Bugs?

By: Amber Roberts



Photos via Centers for Disease Control

Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius) are making a powerful, if undesirable, comeback after becoming scarce due to pesticide use in the 1950s. These parasites, once thought to infest only cheap motels . . .

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What to Do if Your Dog Swallowed a Fish Hook

By: Sondra Wolfer


Fishing with dogs can be a blast, but it comes with certain risks.
Photo by Dylan Tucker, Tucker Fly Fishing

Most veterinarians near bodies of water have treated their share of dogs who’ve swallowed fish hooks whole, or who have fish hooks imbedded in their skin. It only takes an instant. Your dog . . .

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CPR, First Aid, and Life Jackets for Dogs

By: Jill Jones

Some of the best things about dogs is they are fun, devoted, loyal, and relatively care-free companions. But what happens when things go wrong and they get hurt? Do you know what to do in the absence of ready access to a veterinarian? If your answer is no, don’t feel bad—you’re certainly not alone. But you’ve heard the conventional wisdom, “an ounce of prevention is worth an ounce of cure.” In this case, it means having a dog-specific first-aid kit on hand and learning how to use it. It also means taking measures to keep your dog safe when he is in potentially dangerous situations, such as equipping him with a life jacket when he’s out on the water with you. For further peace of mind, you may want to learn how to perform CPR on your dog, in case of the unthinkable.

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Lyme Disease in Dogs

By: Amber Roberts


Is your dog suddenly sleepy or lethargic more often?
Photo by Kris, Yukon

Canine Lyme disease, a tick-borne illness caused by the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi, is a concern for many dog owners. Lyme disease diagnoses have been on the rise since it was discovered, . . .

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