Pet Adoption Statistics: The Numbers Behind the Need

Each year millions of companion animals enter shelters. Hundreds of thousands are currently in need of homes. Here’s the good news: pet overpopulation has slowed dramatically since the 1970s, when it’s estimated American animal shelters euthanized between 12 and 20 million cats and dogs every year. Compare that to today, when only three to four million animals must be euthanized annually. And here’s another telling fact: in the 1970s there were 67 million pets in American homes, and today there are more than 135 million. In other words, we invite far more animals into our families these days and euthanize far fewer, perhaps suggesting a paradigm shift in how we think about animal stewardship.

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Signs of Affection From Your Dog

You’re treated to signs of affection from your dog every day. Exuberant tail wagging and slobbery kisses from forehead to chin are obvious ones. But some signs of affection are subtler and easily missed unless you know what to look for. Here are seven ways your dog “says” I love you.

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Can You Train Old Dogs?


Make sure you give your older dog time to rest and recoup.
Photo via orvis.com

You can indeed train old dogs, and there are good reasons to make obedience training a lifelong endeavor. After adopting a senior dog, for example, you may discover her previous owners weren’t particular about leash training only after she drags you around the neighborhood on walks. Or, your older dog simply needs a refresher course in Obedience 101. Plus, training old dogs is good for them. It offers critical mental stimulation that can delay cognitive decline in senior dogs, and helps prevent obesity by keeping them physically active.

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Dog Safety During Hunting Season


Photo via orvis.com

If you enjoy hiking with your dog and live in an area with seasonal hunting, hitting the trails takes an extra measure of prep and precaution. Dog safety during hunting season starts with the understanding that you’re sharing the great outdoors, and with an awareness of how hunters engage in their sport. Here’s what you need to know to keep your dog safe when hiking, walking, or running with her during hunting season:

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Podcast: Picking and Training a Dog, with Reid Bryant


Reid Bryant and Collins take a break below a good piece of cover.
Photos by Phil Monahan

Reid takes to the podcast booth to answer some dog questions recently posed by listeners. He discusses terminology, picking a breed, and how to select a methodology for training that . . .

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How to Leash Train Your Dog

By: Sondra Wolfer

“Let’s Go For A Walk!” is the most frequent refrain of dog ownership. The jingle of collar and leash make the music, while wagging tails and prancing paws dance by the door. But if you’ve got a new puppy who hasn’t learned walking manners yet or an adult dog who never learned them, daily walks can be a bit of a drag. Your dog may constantly pull, or bound ahead, yanking you as he goes. Or, alternatively, he may lollygag, making a walk to the corner feel as though it takes a century.

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How to Teach Your Dog to Swim

By: Sondra Wolfer

If your dog can swim, you already know the pleasure of splashing around with your best friend. If your dog can’t swim as of yet—or you are unsure of his aquatic abilities—chances are good you . . .

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Dog Tips: How to Stop Puppies from Biting

By: Jill Jones


Puppies look so cute . . . until they sink those sharp teeth into you.
Photo by Alisa, Rancho Palos Verdes

There’s an old expression, “It’s all fun and games until someone loses an eye,” that’s apt for playing with puppies. Puppies love to use their teeth—for everything—but particularly during play, which . . .

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How to Stop Your Dog from Jumping

By: Sondra Wolfer


Training your dog to sit, rather than jump, is an important step.
Photo by Kate, Newton

The reason your dog jumps on you when you walk through the door is a sweet one — she’s trying to say “hello.” Touching noses is an instinctual salutation among dogs. Because you’re taller than . . .

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