How to Create a Crate Training Schedule for a New Puppy or Dog

Congratulations on your new puppy or dog…and double congratulations on setting up a crate training schedule. A crating schedule will help you raise a wiggly eight-week-old puppy into a dog who is full of good habits (chewing on appropriate items, settling quietly, going to the bathroom where you want) and free of bad habits (house … Continue reading “How to Create a Crate Training Schedule for a New Puppy or Dog”

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Dog-Training Tips: Motivators and Reinforcement

Training your dog at home is a wonderful bonding experience—especially if you are willing to be consistent and put in the work—but there are a few nuances about dog behavior and learning theory you need to understand in order to work with your dog . . .

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How to Stop Your Dog From Barking

Gus gets his bark on.
Photo by Gregory, Pittsburgh

To stop your dog from barking, you must first pinpoint what sets him off and tailor your behavior training to his triggers. His barking is instinctual. But constant barking is intolerable for you and the rest of his human family. Let the barking continue for too long unabated, and you may face discontented neighbors who are suffering along with you. Read on to learn the common causes of excessive barking; how much barking is acceptable; and most importantly, how to curtail incessant barking, day or night. We’ll also give you a rundown of which dog breeds bark the most—and the least.

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How to Leash Train Your Dog

Leash training does not have to look only one particular way or involve only one piece of training equipment. This post will answer some common questions and describe some techniques and equipment that have worked for many, many people and dogs—give them a try!

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Dog Collars vs Harnesses

A harness is often a better choice than a collar.
Photo via orvis.com

Generally, unless your dog is a puller, a collar will be better than harnesses for most dogs. But whether a harness or collar is the best choice for your dog really depends on her age, breed, and walking style. For rambunctious, active, and younger dogs, a harness can facilitate training and give you more control and can do so with ease and minimal exertion on your part. For older, well-trained dogs, a collar with a leash does the trick. Sometimes, you’ll want both on hand depending on where you’re headed on your adventures. 

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Dog Collars: Buckles vs. Clips

Whether they close with a clip or a buckle, dog collars have two main functions: to keep the two of you together, and to provide ID information that can help reunite you if you become separated…all in a way that is safe for your dog. 

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How a Dog Crate Helps with Potty Training and More

When left out on their own, puppies can get in a lot of trouble. These unsupervised moments allow the puppy to chew on clothing and furniture or to have an accident inside. Unfortunately, when our pup gets into this kind of . . .

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Dog Safety During Hunting Season


Photo via orvis.com

If you enjoy hiking with your dog and live in an area with seasonal hunting, hitting the trails takes an extra measure of prep and precaution. It is possible to walk your dog safely during hunting season, but doing so requires the understanding that you’re sharing the great outdoors and an awareness of how hunters engage in their sport. Being safe while walking your dog during hunting season requires:

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5 Tips for Becoming a Better Dog Walker

Walking your dog offers several benefits: It provides physical and mental stimulation, gives your dog chances to socialize, and provides many training opportunities. Walking your dog on a regular schedule provides an . . .

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Pet Adoption Statistics: The Numbers Behind the Need

Each year millions of companion animals enter shelters. Hundreds of thousands are currently in need of homes. Here’s the good news: pet overpopulation has slowed dramatically since the 1970s, when it’s estimated American animal shelters euthanized between 12 and 20 million cats and dogs every year. Compare that to today, when only three to four million animals must be euthanized annually. And here’s another telling fact: in the 1970s there were 67 million pets in American homes, and today there are more than 135 million. In other words, we invite far more animals into our families these days and euthanize far fewer, perhaps suggesting a paradigm shift in how we think about animal stewardship.

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