Fish Facts: Largemouth Bass, a.k.a Ol’ Bucketmouth


Illustration by Duane Raver via USFWS

Among the more widely distributed game fish in North America, and now around the world, the largemouth bass is prized for its aggressive feeding habits and violent strikes. A big bass blowing up the water around a popper chugging across flat water is. . .

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Fish Facts: Pink Salmon (Oncorhyncus gorbuscha)


The large hump in front of the dorsal fin on spawning males is the reason for the species’s nickname, “Humpy.”
Illustration by Timothy Knepp – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

In the angling community, the pink salmon (Oncorhyncus gorbuscha) is not generally held in the same high esteem as its cousins, the Chinook, coho, and sockeye. However, the sheer. . .

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Fish Facts: False Albacore (Euthynnus alletteratus)


Dave Woolley with a false albacore that most likely would have broken the Connecticut state record.
Photo by Chick Corrado

The false albacore (Euthynnus alletteratus) goes by many names—little tunny, fat albert, bonito, spotted bonito—but whatever anglers call it, the species is prized for its blistering runs and sheer power. The smallest. . .

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Fish Facts: Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout


The iconic species of our oldest national park, the Yellowstone cutthroat draws anglers from around the world.
Photo by USFWS

The names of many legendary fishing spots in Yellowstone National Park—Buffalo Ford, the Lamar Valley, the meadows of Slough Creek—are synonymous with big, native Yellowstone cutthroat . . .

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Fish Facts: Smallmouth Bass (Micropterus dolomieu)


When trout streams start to get too warm, the fishing for smallies often heats up.
Photo by Drew Price

The smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) goes by many nicknames—smallie, bronzeback, brownie, and brown bass, to name a few—which is a sign of its popularity in different parts of the country. It’s the most trout–like bass, in that it often lives in clean, cold rivers and feeds on insects, baitfish, and. . .

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Fish Facts: Permit (Trachinotus falcatus)

The permit’s Latin name, Trachinotus falcatus, identifies the species as a real warrior. Trachinotus is a fusion of Greek words that mean “rough back,” while falcatus is a Latin adjective that translates roughly to “armed with scythes.”

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Fish Facts: Common Snook (Centropomus undecimalis)


Catching a really large snook is a bucket-list item for many saltwater anglers.
Photo via Livit Films

The most abundant of the twelve snook species, the common snook (Centropomus undecimalis) is prized by anglers for its aggressive strikes and go-for-broke fighting style. You can target. . .

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Fish Facts: Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus)


Bluegills are often the “easy” fish anglers learn on, but the big ones can be mighty tough to fool.
Photo courtesy Lousiville Zoo via wikipedia

Most of us have an early memory of reeling in bluegills from a local pond, using just a worm or some equally homey bait. The fact that the species, Lepomis macrochirus, goes by many. . .

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Fish Facts: Saving the Greenback Cutthroat Trout (Updated!)


Greenback cutthroat trout were saved by accident more than 130 years ago.
Photo by Kevin Rogers – CPW

Although the greenback cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki stomias has been the focus of conservation efforts for more than half a century—starting when the once-lost species was. . .

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