Fish Facts: Grand Barracuda (Sphyraena barracuda)


Barracuda are a blast to chase with a fly, as they can be aggressive and fight like hell.
Photo by Greg Vincent, of H2O Bonefishing 

The great barracuda (Sphyraena barracuda) isn’t generally considered one of the premier saltwater fly rod species—it’s not part of the flats Grand Slam, for instance—and few fly fishers head to . . .

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Fish Facts: Dolly Varden (Salvelinus malma)


This illustration of a Dolly Varden is from Evermann and Goldsborough’s The Fishes of Alaska (1907).
Photo via Wikipedia

Like the two species to which is it closely related—Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus)—the Dolly Varden (Salvelinus malma) is a true char that is found . . .

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Fish Facts: Sculpins (genus Cottus)


Prickly sculpin (Cottus asper) demonstrates the classic sculpin shape: big head, wide fins, tapering body.
Photo by U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Ever since Don Gapen tied the first Muddler Minnow in 1936, fly fishers have recognized that freshwater sculpins (genus Cottus) can be important forage fish for trout, and there are now . . .

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Fish Facts: Largemouth Bass, a.k.a Ol’ Bucketmouth


Illustration by Duane Raver via USFWS

Among the more widely distributed game fish in North America, and now around the world, the largemouth bass is prized for its aggressive feeding habits and violent strikes. A big bass blowing up the water around a popper chugging across flat water is. . .

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Fish Facts: Pink Salmon (Oncorhyncus gorbuscha)


The large hump in front of the dorsal fin on spawning males is the reason for the species’s nickname, “Humpy.”
Illustration by Timothy Knepp – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

In the angling community, the pink salmon (Oncorhyncus gorbuscha) is not generally held in the same high esteem as its cousins, the Chinook, coho, and sockeye. However, the sheer. . .

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Fish Facts: False Albacore (Euthynnus alletteratus)


Dave Woolley with a false albacore that most likely would have broken the Connecticut state record.
Photo by Chick Corrado

The false albacore (Euthynnus alletteratus) goes by many names—little tunny, fat albert, bonito, spotted bonito—but whatever anglers call it, the species is prized for its blistering runs and sheer power. The smallest. . .

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Fish Facts: Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout


The iconic species of our oldest national park, the Yellowstone cutthroat draws anglers from around the world.
Photo by USFWS

The names of many legendary fishing spots in Yellowstone National Park—Buffalo Ford, the Lamar Valley, the meadows of Slough Creek—are synonymous with big, native Yellowstone cutthroat . . .

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Fish Facts: Smallmouth Bass (Micropterus dolomieu)


When trout streams start to get too warm, the fishing for smallies often heats up.
Photo by Drew Price

The smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) goes by many nicknames—smallie, bronzeback, brownie, and brown bass, to name a few—which is a sign of its popularity in different parts of the country. It’s the most trout–like bass, in that it often lives in clean, cold rivers and feeds on insects, baitfish, and. . .

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Fish Facts: Permit (Trachinotus falcatus)

The permit’s Latin name, Trachinotus falcatus, identifies the species as a real warrior. Trachinotus is a fusion of Greek words that mean “rough back,” while falcatus is a Latin adjective that translates roughly to “armed with scythes.”

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