Announcing the Winners of the 2018 “20 Days in September” Photo Contest


The iconic angler’s pose and dreamlike atmosphere wowed voters.
Photo by Dan Miller

This year’s “20 Days in September” Contest represented a huge leap forward, producing more than 2,000 great photos from anglers around the world. (Although anglers outside the U.S. weren’t eligible for the prizes, many took the challenge . . .


The iconic angler’s pose and dreamlike atmosphere wowed voters.
Photo by Dan Miller

This year’s “20 Days in September” Contest represented a huge leap forward, producing more than 2,000 great photos from anglers around the world. (Although anglers outside the U.S. weren’t eligible for the prizes, many took the challenge seriously.) Even those who couldn’t get the full 20 days in seemed to enjoy discovering new waters right in their backyards and sneaking off for a few casts at lunchtime or after work.

Last week, we presented you with 10 finalists for the contest’s prizes. Right off the bat, one image began to run away from the others. After more than 3,000 voters had picked their top three images, our winner was on top by more than 900 votes. The battle for second and third places was very tight, though, with several position changes over the past week. Congrats to all the photographers who made the finals!

Your top choice was fishingmill’s dreamlike shot (above) of an angler fighting a fish on a misty morning. Incredibly, this is a self-shot photo. Winner Dan Miller, of High Ridge, Missouri, explained:

The picture was taken at Lake Taneycomo. I got on the water really early that morning. The fog was lifting off the water, so I positioned the camera for the shot. I knew there were lots of trout where I was fishing, so it was just a matter of timing the shot. Unfortunately, I didn’t land any big browns that day, but it was nice to get out on the water and catch some rainbows. When I am fishing, I’m always carrying a fly rod in one hand and a tripod in the other.

For capturing such a powerful image, Delano will receive a Helios 3 Fly Rod of his choice.


Voters loved how all the elements of this shot work together to capture the magic.
Photo by Jud Cherry

In second place was marchbrowneyedun’s glorious photo of a young girl and her dog scanning the horizon from shore. Photographer Jud Cherry, of Austin, Texas, described how the scene came about:

This photo was taken at Lake Georgetown in central Texas. The lake was very low, and we were able to reach out past the drop-off with our streamers and let them sink deep enough to tempt the large bass patrolling the rim of the main channel. A thunderstorm was brewing to the west, and as a large gray column of rain began to fall in the distance, we began the long walk back to the car wondering if we would get caught in it. My daughter, Deighan, climbed up on this stump to get a good view of the clouds. Ranger joined her, and I snapped a handful of pictures as fast as I could. Fortunately the rain went south of us and we made it to the car with dry clothes and a dry iPhone with some beautiful photos. It was a good day.

For coming in second, Judd gets an American-made Mirage fly reel, which he plans to put on Deighan’s fly rod.


This fish posed perfectly for Toby Nolan’s prize-winning shot.
Photo by Toby Nolan

Third place went to oregononthefly’s epic low-angle shot of an angler making a Spey cast. Photographer Toby Nolan, of Bend, Oregon–who also took third place last year–said that his photo was the result of good fortune:

During a work trip to Southern Oregon, I took advantage of a Sunday off (the last day of September!) to fish the stunning Rogue River for steelhead. After swinging through the first run of the morning, I turned my attention back upriver to another angler working his way down the same run. After heavy rains the night before, the river gorge was filled with mist, first light was starting to break through, and the angler was forming beautiful D-loops. The scene was too stunning to not stop and photograph. After asking permission to take his photo, we continued to chat and fish, and before long we were floating the Rogue in his drift boat. A great day meeting new people, catching incredible fish, and experience a beautiful fishery.

Toby’s prize is a pair of American-made Orvis Nippers!

Everyone who voted for our finalists was eligible for a prize, as well. We plugged in the numbers, and the widget at random.org spat out a winner: Matthew McDowell, who wrote, “Those are tough pics to choose just three! Great contest!”

Finally, thanks to everyone who participated in this year’s “20 Days in September” Challenge by fishing, submitting photos, voting, or commenting (or all of these). This was a tough September for me, but I got my 20 days in with just a few empty spaces on the calendar to spare.

Here’s a great idea: Let’s all do it again next year!

Vote for the Winners in Our “20 Days in September” Contest—and Maybe Win Something for Yourself!


Whittling down to these ten finalists was a difficult job!
Photomontage by Phil Monahan

Starting on the first day of September, many of you committed to trying to get on the water at least 20 times during the next 30 days. As an added incentive–although you probably didn’t need one–we launched our fourth annual “20 Days in . . .


Whittling down to these ten finalists was a difficult job!
Photomontage by Phil Monahan

Starting on the first day of September, many of you committed to trying to get on the water at least 20 times during the next 30 days. As an added incentive–although you probably didn’t need one–we launched our fourth annual “20 Days in September” Photo Contest, which required entrants to post photos to the Orvis Fly Fishing Facebook or Instagram page, along with the hashtags #20sepdays and #orvisflyfishing. Participation increased by leaps and bounds this year, with more than 2,000 entries! Our crack team of in-house judges have chosen 10 finalists–which wasn’t easy, let me tell you.

Take a close look at the 10 photos in the widget below (click on each image to see a larger version), and  then choose your three favorites. The photographers are competing for some great prizes:

First Place: A Helios 3 Fly Rod of your choice.

 

Second Place: A Mirage Fly Reel of your choice.

 

Third Place: A pair of Orvis Made-in-the-USA Nippers.

We’ll also give a pair of nippers to one randomly selected voter.

Important Note: To be eligible to win the nippers, you MUST leave a comment about the photos in the comments section below. (That’s the only way we’ll know who you are, since the poll widget doesn’t collect data on voters.)

Voting ends at 11:59 p.m. on Tuesday, October 9th, and we will announce the winners on Wednesday, October 10th.

So choose our three winners, hit the “vote” button, and then leave a comment below!


Don’t forget to leave your comment for a chance to win!

Remembering PA Fly-Fishing Legend Charlie Meck

Written by: Paul Weamer


Charlie Meck was an idol to generations of East Coast trout anglers.
Photos courtesy charlesmeck.com and legacy.com

Today is a very sad day for me and the fly-fishing world. My friend Charlie Meck died on Tuesday afternoon. He passed peacefully with his family beside him. Charlie was a fly-fishing icon, . . .

Written by: Paul Weamer


Charlie Meck was an idol to generations of East Coast trout anglers.
Photos courtesy charlesmeck.com and legacy.com

Editor’s note: Pennsylvania fly-fishing legend Charlie Meck passed away last week. I could write a standard remembrance, but then I saw Paul Weamer’s beautiful tribute on his Facebook page on September 20. He’s generously given us permission to publish it here.

Today is a very sad day for me and the fly-fishing world. My friend Charlie Meck died on Tuesday afternoon. He passed peacefully with his family beside him.

Charlie was a fly-fishing icon, the author of fifteen fly-fishing books and hundreds of articles, and a member of the Pennsylvania Fly Fishing Hall of Fame.

Charlie was the first angler to write in-depth about the Hexagenia atrocaudata hatch. His book, Pennsylvania Trout Streams and Their Hatches, really created the genre of river guide books that are so common today. Perhaps Charlie is best known for his fly pattern, the Patriot, which was one of the first dries to incorporate synthetic materials in its construction.

Many younger fly fishers may not realize that when they fish a tandem set, with a dry fly and nymph, that they probably owe this prolific fish-catching technique to Charlie. Charlie was on a western fishing trip, and his guide used a tandem rig to fish. Fishing this way was very uncommon to Eastern fly fishers at the time. It wasn’t until Charlie detailed the technique in his groundbreaking book, Patterns, Hatches, Tactics, and Trout, that most eastern fly fishers began using dry-dropper rigs. Charlie made many other contributions–too many to list here–to our understanding of fly-fishing hatches and theory.


Charlie Meck (right) and Paul Weamer on the banks of Pennsylvania’s Spruce Creek.
Photo by George Daniel

But for all that Charlie gave to the fly-fishing world during his life, he gave much more to humanity. Charlie was one of the finest human beings I’ve known. He was kind, humble, unpretentious, and he loved people. His caring acts affected hundreds and most will never be known beyond the people he helped. I dedicated my first book to him because I may have never had a fly-fishing career without his guidance. But I’m also a better man because I knew him.

A few months ago, Charlie and I were discussing our books–which ones were our favorites, which sold better than others. Charlie told me that his favorite book he wrote was Memory Rising: Hatches, Waters, & Trout. If you’ve never read it, you should.

Seven years ago, I wrote a piece for my Fly Fisherman magazine blog about Charlie. You can read it here.

Today the sun rose. Fish will rise. And anglers will head to trout waters to cast their flies. But the world and the waters won’t be the same without Charlie in them. I will miss our talks, my friend. Thank you.

Paul Weamer is a fly-fishing guide, contributing editor for Fly Fisherman, and author. His most recent book is The Bug Book: A Fly Fisher’s Guide to Trout Stream Insects

The 2018 “20 Days in September” Contest Kicks Off Today!


Last year’s ten finalists made voting for a winner very difficult!
Photomontage by Phil Monahan

Although meteorological summer doesn’t end for another three weeks, Labor Day is usually considered the end of the season. The kids are back at school, summer hours at work are over, and . . .


Last year’s ten finalists made voting for a winner very difficult!
Photomontage by Phil Monahan

Although meteorological summer doesn’t end for another three weeks, Labor Day is usually considered the end of the season. The kids are back at school, summer hours at work are over, and the nights are growing increasingly crisp. It’s a time to reflect on how well you spent those longest days of the year.

Back in 2014, I had a tough summer, fishingwise, so to make up for it, I set myself a goal: to go fishing 20 days during the month of September. Thus was born the “20 Days in September” Project. I had so much fun—and enjoyed my time on the water so much—that we opened up the project to everyone and turned it into a photo contest on Facebook and Instagram. Every year since, the contest has attracted more and more participants, who tell us what a blast they have trying to complete the challenge. As blog reader Mike Sepelak recently commented:

The contest is GREAT fun. Each year it’s encouraged me to find new local waters and revisit long neglected “fishin’ holes” in order to add variety to the month. It’s also encouraged me get creative when I’ve had to do non-fishing related travel. I’ve managed 20+ each of the past two years and really, really look forward to doing it again.

Here’s how it works:

1. Make an honest attempt to get on the water 20 times during September. Of course, these don’t have to be full or even half days of angling. Just 10 casts are enough to count on any given day. So steal time whenever you can: before work, at lunchtime, after work, or . . .(cough) during work. On weekends when your schedule is full, get in a few casts around soccer or football games.

2. Take pictures of your fish, the water, your fellow anglers, the flies you’re using, or anything else. (Photos must be taken during September, 2018.)

3. Post your photos to the Orvis Fly Fishing Facebook page or on Instagram with the hashtags #orvisflyfishing and #20sepdays. (Only photos using both hashtags will be eligible!)
At the end of the month, we’ll go through all the photos posted as part of the project and pick 10 finalists. Then we’ll let you vote for the winners! (Last year’s finalists make up the photomontage at the top of this page.)

Here are the prizes:

First Place: A Helios 3 Fly Rod of your choice.

 

Second Place: A Mirage Fly Reel of your choice.

 

Third Place: A pair of Orvis Made-in-the-USA Nippers.

We’ll also give a pair of nippers to one randomly selected voter at the end of the contest.

You don’t have to complete your 20 days to be eligible to win, but we will have a Roll of Honor for those who do manage to complete the Project. So start thinking about all the great waters you’re going to fish throughout the month.

Click here for the full contest rules and conditions.

Click here for your own calendar to track your progress.

The 2018 “20 Days in September” Contest Starts Tomorrow!


Last year’s winning photo, by Delano Jennings, was a study in reflections and textures.
Photo by Delano Jennings

For anglers who spend the summer chasing different fish species in rivers, lakes, and saltwater, the advent of fall can seem bittersweet. Back in 2015, to ensure that we make the most of the late . . .


Last year’s winning photo, by Delano Jennings, was a study in reflections and textures.
Photo by Delano Jennings

For anglers who spend the summer chasing different fish species in rivers, lakes, and saltwater, the advent of fall can seem bittersweet. Back in 2015, to ensure that we make the most of the late season, we launched the “20 Days in September” Photo Contest, which asks participants to dedicate extra time time to fly fishing throughout the ninth month. Over the past three years, the contest has grown by leaps and bounds, and those who have taken on the challenge have sent us countless emails and messages about how much fun they’ve had and how the contest has led them to discover local ponds and streams they’d overlooked for years.

So we’re hoping to build on that success and have even more participation in 2018. And if you check out the prize list below, I think you’re going to want to give the contest a try this year.


Last year’s ten finalists made voting for a winner very difficult!
Photomontage by Phil Monahan

Here’s how it works:

1. Make an honest attempt to get on the water 20 times during September. Of course, these don’t have to be full or even half days of angling. Just 10 casts are enough to count on any given day. So steal time whenever you can: before work, at lunchtime, after work, or . . .(cough) during work. On weekends when your schedule is full, get in a few casts around soccer or football games.

2. Take pictures of your fish, the water, your fellow anglers, the flies you’re using, or anything else. (Photos must be taken during September, 2018.)

3. Post your photos to the Orvis Fly Fishing Facebook page or on Instagram with the hashtags #orvisflyfishing and #20sepdays. (Only photos using both hashtags will be eligible!)

At the end of the month, we’ll go through all the photos posted as part of the project and pick 10 finalists. Then we’ll let you vote for the winners! (Check out all of last year’s finalists here.)

Here are the prizes:

 

First Place: A Helios 3 Fly Rod of your choice.

 

 

Second Place: A Mirage Fly Reel of your choice.

 

 

Third Place: A pair of Orvis Made-in-the-USA Nippers.

 

We’ll also give a pair of nippers to one randomly selected voter at the end of the contest.

You don’t have to complete your 20 days to be eligible to win, but we will have a Roll of Honor for those who do manage to complete the Project. So start thinking about all the great waters you’re going to fish throughout the month.

We will have the full contest rules ready when the contest launches on September 1.

Are Beavers Good or Bad for Trout? It Depends. . .


Depending on where you live, this guy could be a friend or foe.
Photo by Steve from washington, dc, usa, via Wikipedia

The Hendrickson spinners were just starting to descend on the Battenkill one calm evening last spring, and the river’s wild brown trout were ready. A good fish had begun rising just upstream, . . .


Depending on where you live, this guy could be a friend or foe.
Photo by Steve from washington, dc, usa, via Wikipedia

The Hendrickson spinners were just starting to descend on the Battenkill one calm evening last spring, and the river’s wild brown trout were ready. A good fish had begun rising just upstream, so I moved very slowly into casting position and then spent a couple minutes timing the rises, checking my knots, and planning the presentation. The light was fading fast, leaving time for just a few drifts over the trout, which was surely more than 20 inches long. I false-cast once, twice, and was preparing to lay the line out, when the water right behind me exploded with a tremendous concussion, startling me so badly that I nearly jumped right out of my waders, stumbling forward a couple steps. My line crashed to the surface in a heap, and my panicked reaction sent ripples up and down the pool, effectively ending any shot I had at the big trout. I turned to see a huge beaver circling back for another go. After a second tail slap for emphasis, he disappeared below the surface.

At that moment, I probably would have supported a Vermont Fish and Wildlife trapping campaign in that stretch of the Battenkill, since the large rodent had clearly been detrimental to my fishing experience. But a more serious examination of whether beavers are ultimately good or bad for trout streams requires some complex weighing of divergent factors. Trout Unlimited Senior Scientist Dr. Jack Williams says that, although he is asked about beavers all the time, “It’s hard to make generalizations because the effects of beavers are so site-specific.”

Biologists refer to the beaver (Castor canadensis) as a “keystone species” because its effect is so disproportionate to its abundance. Aside from man, no animal has such a profound effect on its ecosystem, and many anglers see the beavers’ work as predominately destructive—turning a babbling trout stream into a slow-moving wetland, for instance. However, wildlife biologists recognize that each of these “destructive” effects has a flip side: situations in which that very same effect is beneficial to trout. After looking at all the data, then, the question “Are beavers good or bad for trout streams?” can be answered only with a definitive, “It depends.”

A History of Conflict
Picture your favorite trout stream, and then imagine what it would look like after it has been dammed by beavers. These mental images can be dramatically different depending on where you fish. On a high-gradient mountain stream, a beaver dam might create a nice pool where you’ll find deeper water and larger fish, but a lowland river might be turned into a shallow, swampy, and perhaps troutless mess. This is what Doctor Williams means by “site-specific.” And whereas a fisheries manager in the Upper Midwest might spend a lot of time blowing beaver dams and relocating the animals, his counterpart in the Rockies might be spend his energies trying to attract beaver families to a watershed.


Beaver dams can help store water in a watershed, keeping water flows more steady during droughts.
Photo by Franklin Vera Pachecovia Wikipedia

It’s worth remembering that beavers and native trout species (brook, rainbow, and cutthroat) evolved together in North America. Before Europeans arrived, the continent’s beaver population was an estimated 60 to 400 million—which means that the free-flowing rivers that we know today were probably much less common, as most would have had series of dams interrupting their flows. Unfortunately for the beavers, their pelts were in high demand around the globe, and by 1930, there were perhaps as few as 100,000 beavers left, mostly in Canada. As a result of trapping bans and restoration efforts, the beaver population has rebounded to between 6 and 10 million animals, which is still a small fraction of the original number.

Beavers build dams to provide protection from predators and to provide easy access to food, but the ponds that these dams create slow the current and expose the water to more intense sunlight exposure—both of which can lead to a rise in water temperature. These effects can be exacerbated by dark silt, which settles at the bottom of the pond and absorbs heat, and the removal of shade trees from the riverbank. In thermally sensitive low-lying rivers or where trout habitat is already marginal during the summer months, this warming and the accompanying decline in dissolved-oxygen levels can make a stream unsuitable for trout survival. This is why the Wisconsin DNR has been trapping beavers and blowing up dams for the past 35 years, especially in the northeastern part of the state. As Duke Welter—Trout Unlimited’s Western Great Lakes Conservation Coordinator and Outreach Coordinator of the Driftless Area Restoration Effort (DARE)—explains, “Beavers manipulate the system, and so do we.”

The Wisconsin effort is in part based the results of an 18-year project (1982-2000) by wildlife biologist Ed Avery, which studied the effects of removing 546 beaver dams from 32 miles of the Pemonee River and its tributaries. Avery’s findings were compelling: Summertime water temperatures were significantly cooler in 2000 than they had been in 1982; wild brook trout populations were 67% higher in spring and 17% in the fall; the average size of wild brookies increased from 7.6 inches to 8.9 inches; and the number of fish over 7 inches increased by an astonishing 311%. It’s easy to understand why anglers in the Badger State are in favor of keeping the number of beavers in check.

But in the West, where drought is much more common, beaver-created ponds and wetlands can be important tools in the effort to manage water by holding as much of it as possible in the headwaters of river systems. Not only does a beaver pond serve as a reservoir, keeping vital snowmelt from running off too quickly, but the wetlands created by beavers can also serve to raise the water table—storing vital groundwater for the dry months ahead and supporting native streamside vegetation. On Nevada’s Maggie Creek, for instance, TU has been working with multiple partners for more than 20 years to restore Lahontan-cutthroat habitat. The arrival of beaver colonies, which were not part of the original restoration plan, turned out to be a boon to the project, as the wetlands created by dams made the stream more resistant to drought and wildfire and altered the runoff schedule to help trout survive the dry season.


In some areas, beaver dams create fine habitat for bigger trout.
Photo by Walter Siegmund via Wikipedia

On rivers such as the Upper Yakima in Washington, beavers are being reintroduced as a way to add “stream complexity” by creating deep pools, reconnecting channels, and introducing wood. This will help to provide better habitat for salmon-rearing, as well as slow down the runoff each spring. The importance of beavers to the Northwest’s ecosystem is reflected by a series of workshops—titled “Restoring Beaver to Restore Rivers” and hosted by an advocacy group called Worth a Dam—that were held last year in four cities from Northern California to Southeast Alaska.

Pros and Cons
It seems that in almost every situation, where the beaver taketh away he also giveth. When a beaver cuts down streamside trees, which provide vital shade, the water temperature may rise slightly because of increased sun exposure. But those same trees and smaller pieces of wood that fall in the water can become important “cover”—fish-holding structure that offers protection from predators and a break from the current. The deep holes that form behind fallen trees offer a thermal refuge in times of low water and provide safe haven for young of the year and smaller fish, as well as habitat for larger fish.

Similarly, the silt that settles on the bottom of a beaver pond may absorb heat and cover good spawning gravel, but it may also produce a larger mass of food, especially Chironomids, than a free-flowing stream does. Studying a beaver colony in the Sierra Nevada in the late 1950s Dr. Richard Gard found that, in the first few years after a pond is formed, the trout there were considerably larger than those in the stream, although the size difference lessened over time. He also witnessed brown and brook trout rooting in the silt and eating the Chironomid larvae they dislodged. He concluded that “beavers are of substantial benefit to trout in Sagehen Creek,” although he noted that “studies from unlike areas often indicate grossly different conclusions.”

One final criticism of beavers that you’ll often hear is that their dams block fish migrations, which would be a real problem because we know how damaging blocked or perched culverts can be to both the distribution of trout in a stream and their ability to find good spawning habitat. However, a recent study by the U.S. Forest Service and several Utah universities found that, for species that evolved alongside North American beavers, the dams do not seem to be much of a problem a problem. After fitting more than 1,300 trout with PIT tags, the researchers were able to track almost 500 passes through or over dams. Cutthroat trout and brook trout were able to move through beaver dams relatively freely, but the movements of brown trout were somewhat impeded.

Winners and Losers
As beaver families return to watersheds treasured by trout anglers, conflicts often arise between the needs of beavers and trout. As Welter puts it, “In any ecological situation, there are winners and losers,” and in places such as northern Wisconsin some streams are managed for trout—on Nine Mile Creek, for instance, more than 120 beavers have been trapped and twenty-five large dams removed—while others are left to the effects of up to 100 beaver dams per mile. On other waterways, expensive stream-restoration work has to be protected from inundation by dams. However, biologists continue to tweak the process, and the WDNR is in the process of revising its Beaver Management Plan to cover 2015 through 2025; one of its stated goals is to “develop a better understanding of the beaver/trout/watershed relationship.”

As the effects of climate change continue to cause waters to warm and droughts to become more severe, our ability to manage this relationship will become increasingly important. In many parts of the country, restoring beaver wetlands will be the most effective and economically feasible method for protecting watersheds. What that means for trout will depend on a divergent number of factors, and both anglers and biologists will have to weigh all the pros and cons when deciding how to manage each stream.

This story first appeared in Trout Magazine.

Remembering Art Lee, Revered Angler and Writer


Art Lee’s books changed the way many anglers approached fly fishing.

The fly-fishing community lost a legendary angler, writer, raconteur, and mentor on July 25, when Catskills fixture Art Lee passed away from a heart attack at the age of 76. Although he had . . .


Art Lee’s books changed the way many anglers approached fly fishing.

The fly-fishing community lost a legendary angler, writer, raconteur, and mentor on July 25, when Catskills fixture Art Lee passed away from a heart attack at the age of 76. Although he had receded from public life for most of the past decade, he was an important figure from the 70s through 90s, authoring three books and for many years writing a column for Fly Fisherman magazine. The New York Times ran a long, interesting obituary of Lee last week, which I highly recommend.

Because he knew Lee well, I asked Tom Rosenbauer to put together a few words of tribute. Here’s what Tom sent me:

Art Lee was one of those eccentric fly-fishing personalities who seem to become less common every year in the age of Instagram fame. He was an absolutely brilliant angler and was the one who first taught me how to fish the giant pools on the lower Delaware. I remember one day when I was fishing to rising rainbows in the middle of the river with size 14 dry flies and 4X tippet, while Art stalked a huge brown trout in shallow water that I would never even have thought of fishing. He caught and landed the beast on a tiny Brassie and 7X. Fishing with Art always involved a preliminary at his house, when he would expound on a topic (or a series of topics) for hours on end. He was always fascinating, even in his long monologues, but the haze of cigarette smoke combined with his dozen cats crawling all over you would make it mandatory to get out of his tiny house and out on the river. And on those outings he would always teach me something valuable.

Click here to read the New York Times obituary by Donald G. McNeil Jr.

Orvis Job Wall 08.07.18


The view from Orvis HQ in southwestern Vermont is inspiring (although sometimes also distracting).
Photo via the Orvis Webcam

Welcome to the Orvis Job Wall, where we update you periodically on the opportunities to be a part of the Orvis team. If you read this blog regularly, you’re probably already aware of what a great . . .


The view from Orvis HQ in southwestern Vermont is inspiring (although sometimes also distracting).
Photo via the Orvis Webcam

Welcome to the Orvis Job Wall, where we update you periodically on the opportunities to be a part of the Orvis team. If you read this blog regularly, you’re probably already aware of what a great place this is to work—from the beautiful office building nestled into the Green Mountains, to the onsite bass-and-trout pond, to the opportunity to run into Tom Rosenbauer every day. (Of course, I get to sit right next to him.) In this edition of the “Job Wall,” we’ve got Retail Manager positions at desirable locations (for fly fishers), as well as a bunch of Fishing Manager openings and some jobs for folks with computer or digital expertise.

Click the job titles to see a complete job listing, as well as instructions for applying. Click here to see all available job openings.

Retail Store Manager – Jackson Hole, WY
The Orvis Retail Store Manager is the business and cultural leader of the store team, responsible for achieving sales goals, customer satisfaction, and profitability growth as well as understanding, practicing, and being a strong proponent of the Orvis brand and the company culture.  The Store Manager is a retail professional role model in attitude and appearance skilled in the art of communication and customer service, who has the ability to teach these skills to the team and ultimately lead by example.

Each of our retail stores is unique, and the successful Store Manager must be able to understand and tailor the Orvis brand presentation to the space and floor plan of the individual store using demonstrated talent in visual presentation of merchandise.

There are also Store Manager openings in Denver, CO and Greenwich, CT, as well as Retail Sales Associate openings at stores around the country.

Retail Fishing Manager — Richmond, VA
The Orvis Retail Fishing Manager is a retail professional role model in attitude and appearance who drives sales and profit growth by providing a world-class shopping experience to all Orvis customers. The Fishing Manager assists the Store Manager in all management duties of the retail store, is responsible for the daily operations of the fly-fishing department, and demonstrates excellent business acumen including visual merchandising, sales analysis, and success in selling fishing, outdoor and the wider range of Orvis products.

We are looking for managers who can establish, maintain, and promote Sporting Tradition activities that enhance our reputation in the marketplace as well as introduce new customers to this lifestyle through fly-fishing schools, casting clinics, and seminars. The successful Fishing Manager has experience developing relationships with local fly-fishing organizations, conservation groups, Orvis Endorsed Operations, and other partners that can increase customer traffic and the use of Orvis products.

There are also Fishing Manager openings in Birmingham, ALHuntsville, AL; Carmel, INWestbury, NY; and Cincinnati, OH. Plus, Fishing Departments at stores around the country are looking for Retail Sales Associates.

For folks with technical expertise: 

Front End Developer 
The Systems Support Technician will provide technology support for the various computer and communication platforms in The Orvis Company. This involves troubleshooting hardware, software, local area networks, Retail Point of Sales systems as well as voice and data communication networks. This position will provide tier two support and assist remote users with the installation and upgrade of new and existing technologies.


The Orvis Home Office in Sunderland, VT

IT Systems Support Technician 
Our Ecommerce Team is searching for a junior-to-mid level Front End Developer to join our IT group in Sunderland, Vermont. In this role you will be able to help move our application to a new content editing platform and craft front end features and components in our pattern library.  The development team uses leading edge technologies such as ESNext, Angular5+, NgRx, NodeJS, MongoDB and are forward thinking to CSS-Grid, custom properties, custom elements, and other modules.

Digital Asset Librarian
For more than a century and a half we have loved the wild, explored it, and protected it. At our core we are a fly-fishing and wingshooting brand, inspired by nature, driven by curiosity, and fulfilled by adventure. As the longest-running mail order business in the United States, established in 1856, the Orvis Company offers experience and knowledge that no other retail company can. We are seeking a Digital Asset Librarian to join our Creative Services department and contribute to our award winning creative teams. The Digital Asset Librarian will oversee the taxonomy, metadata, and classification of digital assets so that they’re easily accessible by all in Creative Services.

The State of Public Access to Water in America

Do you worry that your access to your favorite waters may be in jeopardy, or are you confused about the access laws in other states you may visit? The good folks at Backcountry Hunters & Anglers . . .

Do you worry that your access to your favorite waters may be in jeopardy, or are you confused about the access laws in other states you may visit? The good folks at Backcountry Hunters & Anglers have put together a comprehensive report, “Stream Access Now,” on the state of public access across the country, and you can read it on the Orvis Fly Fishing Learning Center.

What you might find most useful is the chart that lists every state’s access laws, including definitions of “navigability,” whether there is public floating access through private lands, streambed access through private lands, and the right to portage above high water mark.

Click here to read the report.

Read up on your state’s access laws, starting on page 14, and then visit backcountryhunters.org to learn more and support this new effort. Sign the Stream Access Pledge and join others who are committed to upholding our rights to access America’s streams.

Orvis’s New Rod-Repair System is Fast and Streamlined

Rod repairs are no fun for anyone. Luckily, modern technology can make the process easier, and Orvis has just introduced a new online rod repair system that makes it seamless and quick for . . .


Rod repairs are no fun for anyone. Luckily, modern technology can make the process easier, and Orvis has just introduced a new online rod repair system that makes it seamless and quick for customers to return their rods for repair and track their progress.

The process starts with rod registration. If you registered your Orvis rod when it was purchased, all you need to do to start the repair process is sign into your account. All your Orvis rods will appear, and then it’s just a simple matter of picking which rod needs repair and answering a series of questions. The entire process takes less than two minutes, including paying the $60 handling fee. The online repair center also includes detailed instructions for packaging a rod for shipping, and you can even print a shipping label if you want. Then all you have to do is drop off the rod at a FedeX shipping center or bring it to a local Orvis company-owned store.

The system than emails an order confirmation, with a repair number that allows you to track the progress of your rod. Of course, customers can always call the Orvis technical line to talk to an expert about the repair, if they desire.

One of the most exciting aspects of this new system is that, for the new Helios 3 rods, a customer can order a new section without returning the entire rod. In the past, you’d have to send in the whole rod, so the repair folks could ensure a proper ferrule fit. But the consistency of Helios 3 blanks and a new ferrule design mean that a new section can be sent to a customer with complete confidence that it will fit perfectly. (Only if the butt section is damaged, does the whole rod need to be returned.)

Rod repair does take up to six weeks, depending on the availability of repair parts. But this new system will greatly decrease the time and effort a customer requires to begin the process. And if you choose to do a replacement section, the repair time can be cut in half.

Click here to check out the new system and to register your Orvis rods.