Video Pro Tips: 4 Flies That Will Work Anywhere

Many fly fishers carry around way more flies than they’ll ever need for a single trip, and there’s always interest in ways to lighten the load. If you had a few flies that you could always count on, you wouldn’t have to pack so many boxes, right?

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Tuesday Tips: “Hit the Head” for More Trout

Written by: George Daniel, Livin On The Fly


The head of a run is a like a food funnel for trout, so the big ones will often nab this prime lie.
Photos courtesy George Daniel

No, this is not about your bladder and its relation to fishing. Instead, it’s a fishing bum’s opinion on where some of the best fish hold during peak hatch season. Here in central Pennsylvania, . . .

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Master Class Monday: How to Avoid Micro-Drag

Drag on a dry fly or nymph can be insidious, causing you to get more refusals, misses, and bad hook sets. Sometimes, this drag is barely visible to the fly fisher, either on a floating dry fly or on an indicator when nymph fishing. But it can be enough to . . .

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Pro Tips: How to Fish the High Water of Spring

Written by: Spencer Durrant


High water presents anglers with plenty of challenges, whether you’re fishing from a boat or wading.
Photo by Spencer Durrant

From the Colorado River drainage to the Snake, western rivers are high, muddy, and a pain to fish. If you know where clean water is, you keep it close to your vest because this spring is so . . .

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Pro Tips: Top 10 Flies for Stillwater Trout

Written by: Drew Rodden, North Park Anglers


Drew Rodden shows off a gorgeous stillwater rainbow from Colorado.
Photo courtesy Drew Rodden

I grew up fishing with conventional tackle for warmwater species around Missouri. But spending my Saturday mornings watching fishing shows on TV, I began to take an interest in fly. . .

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Tuesday Tips: The Basics of “Reading the Water”


The author casts to a spot that provides deep water, near cover, on the edge of good current.
Photo by Sandy Hays

Conventional wisdom says that 10 percent of fishermen catch 90 percent of the fish. Most people assume that these elite “10 percenters” enjoy so much success because of their superior . . .

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