5 Things You Need to Know about Travel to Cuba

Written by: Sarah Thies, Manager of Orvis Travel


Cuba’s pristine flats, stunning fish, and experienced guides are still welcoming American visitors.

If you’ve been thinking about visiting Cuba, you’re probably aware that the federal government has just announced a new policy that features tougher restrictions on American travelers. This has . . .

Written by: Sarah Thies, Manager of Orvis Travel


Cuba’s pristine flats, stunning fish, and experienced guides are still welcoming American visitors.

If you’ve been thinking about visiting Cuba, you’re probably aware that the federal government has just announced a new policy that features tougher restrictions on American travelers. This has left many people confused about whether anyone can still travel legally. But rest assured that any trip with Orvis is fully compliant with U.S. government regulations. Here are answers to the top questions that folks have been asking following the Cuba sanctions issued yesterday by the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC).

1. Is it legal for me to travel to Cuba with Orvis?

Yes, you can confidently travel to Cuba with Orvis, knowing that our trips are fully compliant with the latest OFAC regulations issued on November 8, 2017. While individual people-to-people travel to Cuba will be restricted by the new Cuba sanctions, you can still travel to the island with Orvis through our sponsored people-to-people trips in the company of an Orvis representative.

Orvis remains your trusted resource for a unique, authentic trip that combines world-class fly fishing for bonefish and tarpon with unforgettable interactions with the local Cuban people. When you travel in the company of an Orvis trip leader, you’ll see and experience Cuba like few people do. The historic charm of Old Havana, wildly creative Cuban artists and musicians, and a pristine saltwater fishery make Cuba one of the most enriching destinations you’ll ever visit.


Cuba’s bonefish have not seen many flies, and angling pressure is minimal.

2. How can I book flights to Cuba if individual travel is restricted?

It’s easy to book commercial flights to Cuba, with airfare ranging from just $300-$500 per person, roundtrip from most U.S. cities. The U.S. Department of Transportation has approved commercial flights to Havana from multiple U.S. cities, including New York, Newark, Houston, Atlanta, Miami, Fort Lauderdale, Orlando, Tampa, Charlotte and Los Angeles. Check-in and baggage policies may differ from domestic flights because travel to Cuba is still restricted.

The airline will require you to certify that your travel to Cuba falls into one of the approved categories of travel authorized by OFAC. Your trip qualifies as authorized travel as part of an educational people-to-people exchange sponsored by Orvis. When you book a trip to Cuba with Orvis, we’ll send you more details about flights and arrival and departure information in your trip confirmation package. If you have any questions about booking your commercial flight to Havana, please call us at 800-547-4322.


Travel to Cuba is a wonderful immersion in a unique culture.

3. What travel documents do I need for entry to Cuba?

All U.S. citizens and permanent residents will need a passport with a minimum of two blank pages that is valid for at least six months after the scheduled date of return from Cuba. The Cuban government requires all travelers to obtain a Cuban visa (also known as a tourist card) prior to arrival into Cuba. Orvis can arrange for your tourism visa, as well as required Cuban health insurance.

Orvis also maintains stringent record-keeping for all our travelers so that they don’t need to. We provide our guests with all of the necessary paperwork for the trip and keep records for a minimum of five years, as required by the U.S. Department of the Treasury.

4. Will the new Cuba sanctions impact where I can stay in Cuba?

No. Happily, none of the hotels that Orvis uses are on the restricted list issued by the U.S. State Department. This means that a trip with Orvis is fully compliant with U.S. regulations and our experience won’t be negatively impacted in any way. We spend two nights at one of the top historic hotels in Havana and five nights at Enridan Lodge at Playa Larga Hotel in the sleepy fishing village of Playa Larga.


Cuban food and hospitality are a memorable part of any trip to the island.

5. How will the new Cuba policy changes affect the restaurants and other places Orvis visits?

Orvis spent over two years conducting extensive research to offer customers a unique, authentic experience that is still fully compliant with U.S. government regulations. To provide you with the most authentic experience possible, Orvis has handpicked some of the best family-run restaurants, called paladares, where you’ll enjoy delicious home-cooked meals and learn more about life in Cuba today.

We’ve also arranged a diverse selection of unforgettable interactions with local Cubans–from a private musical performance with a renowned singer/songwriter, a visit to a garage that restores classic automobiles and a meeting with the owner of the first privately-owned fly shop in Cuba. Travelers are sure to leave with a deeper understanding of Cuba and its people.

For more information about our Orvis-exclusive trip to Cuba or to read the answers to all of our frequently asked questions, please visit the Orvis Travel Cuba page. Multiple departures are available and space is limited to only 10 anglers per trip.

Wanna Catch Bonefish in Cuba with Tom Rosenbauer?


The bonefish flats of Cuba are pristine, and the fish are relatively unpressured.
Photos courtesy Orvis Travel

Expansive, rarely-fished saltwater flats. World-class bonefishing with shots at tarpon and permit. Delicious, home-cooked meals. Vibrant culture. Warm, welcoming people. Illuminating . . .


The bonefish flats of Cuba are pristine, and the fish are relatively unpressured.
Photos courtesy Orvis Travel

Expansive, rarely-fished saltwater flats. World-class bonefishing with shots at tarpon and permit. Delicious, home-cooked meals. Vibrant culture. Warm, welcoming people. Illuminating conversation. And the chance to hang with Tom Rosenbauer.

Tom has decided to join our next hosted fly-fishing trip to Cuba–from December 2 through 9–and there are still a few spots available. So, if you love saltwater fly fishing, adventure travel, and good company, this might be the trip you’re looking for. At the heart of the journey are four days of fishing near Ciénaga de Zapata National Park with local guides, some of whom are park naturalists, working to preserve this important ecosystem.

Check out the Cuba page at Orvis Travel, or contact Jeremy Kehrein at 800-547-4322.


Orvis’s Jeremy Kehrein fights a bonefish on the flats of Cuba.

Classic Tuesday Tips: 5 Things to Think About Before Leaving on a Fly-Fishing Trip

Written by: Kaitlin Groundwater, Madison Valley Ranch


Don’t let anything get between you and having a great time on your fly-fishing trip.
Photo courtesy Madison Valley Ranch

As a lifetime traveling fly angler, who now works in the fly-fishing travel industry, I have both experienced and observed several situations that can easily make or break a fly fishing. . .

Written by: Kaitlin Groundwater, Madison Valley Ranch


Don’t let anything get between you and having a great time on your fly-fishing trip.
Photos courtesy Madison Valley Ranch

As a lifetime traveling fly angler, who now works in the fly-fishing travel industry, I have both experienced and observed several situations that can easily make or break a fly fishing trip. Here are five key lessons I’ve learned along the way that can make your adventure as exciting and enjoyable as possible. Happy travels!

1. Don’t buy a lifetime worth of flies in advance
An upcoming fly fishing trip is a thrilling prospect. Many eager anglers will do anything they can to ease the anticipation that builds between booking a trip and boarding the plane. This most frequently comes in the form of poring over “what’s working” blogs in order to stash up on the perfect selection of fish-fooling flies in advance. However, the savvy traveler saves the fly selection for those who experience that particular fishery every day, such as the guide or local fly shop. A lot can change over the course of several weeks, or even days, and what you thought was the perfect selection may end up being an unused box at the end of your trip. Things to stash up on in advance are the basics—such as leaders, tippet, strike indicators, and the like — which if unused during one particular trip can always be useful during a future day on the water.

2. Get to know your host or lodge manager
A great alternative way to channel your pre-trip enthusiasm is to remain in contact with the lodge or guide you will be visiting. There are several things that, if communicated before your arrival, can turn a great trip into a truly unforgettable one. For example, if you have a particular piece of water that you would like to fish, let your host or lodge manager know in advance. Some special spots, such as the remarkable spring creeks in southwestern Montana, are privately owned and may require a reservation in advance as well as a rod fee. Don’t let the fishing opportunity of a lifetime fall by the wayside and discuss with your lodge your fishing options before you arrive!


By taking care of the details early, you’ll have less to worry about when you’re on the water.

3. Check-in with the lodge in advance to see what gear they can provide
We all love carrying our rod tube off a plane. It is a badge of honor signifying to the masses that you have arrived for more than just sightseeing. However, after many incidents of frantically dashing back onto planes to reclaim rods left in overhead compartments, I have learned a vital lesson. I now always opt to save my personal rods for local fisheries and instead use lodge or guide equipment when I can. Not only does this save the traveling angler from potentially being out several hundred dollars of lost gear, but also provides him or her opportunity to test run different rods. (Say, a Helios 2, for instance.) This is an easy way to minimize stress and focus on your strike indicator rather than your luggage.

4. You can’t over pack when it comes to layers
With all the space you now have in your suitcase from leaving gear at home, focus your packing on having the proper clothing for any weather incident. Here in Southwest Montana the sun may shine on Monday, snow on Tuesday, and rain on Wednesday. While the weather forecast can give you a pretty good idea of what you will need to bring, you will never regret having that extra base layer on a chilly Montana morning!


Make sure that you take the time to enjoy the non-fishing joys of your trip.

5. Have fun and make memories
When you’re traveling a long distance with the intention of catching fish, the occasional, but unavoidable slow day can be disheartening. However, there is lots revel in during a fly fishing vacation, whether it be the fizz of a local microbrew being cracked at the end the day, conversation with friends and fellow anglers, or the anticipation of a new day on the water. Don’t sweat the small stuff or small fish…enjoy every step of the way.

Kaitlin Groundwater is the Assistant Lodge Manager of 2015 Orvis-Endorsed Fly-Fishing Lodge of the Year Madison Valley Ranch, in Ennis, Montana.

Tuesday Tips: 5 Things to Think About Before Embarking on a Fly-Fishing Trip

Written by: Kaitlin Groundwater, Madison Valley Ranch


Don’t let anything get between you and having a great time on your fly-fishing trip.
Photo courtesy Madison Valley Ranch

As a lifetime traveling fly angler, who now works in the fly-fishing travel industry, I have both experienced and observed several situations that can easily make or break a fly fishing. . .

Written by: Kaitlin Groundwater, Madison Valley Ranch


Don’t let anything get between you and having a great time on your fly-fishing trip.
Photos courtesy Madison Valley Ranch

As a lifetime traveling fly angler, who now works in the fly-fishing travel industry, I have both experienced and observed several situations that can easily make or break a fly fishing trip. Here are five key lessons I’ve learned along the way that can make your adventure as exciting and enjoyable as possible. Happy travels!

1. Don’t buy a lifetime worth of flies in advance
An upcoming fly fishing trip is a thrilling prospect. Many eager anglers will do anything they can to ease the anticipation that builds between booking a trip and boarding the plane. This most frequently comes in the form of poring over “what’s working” blogs in order to stash up on the perfect selection of fish-fooling flies in advance. However, the savvy traveler saves the fly selection for those who experience that particular fishery every day, such as the guide or local fly shop. A lot can change over the course of several weeks, or even days, and what you thought was the perfect selection may end up being an unused box at the end of your trip. Things to stash up on in advance are the basics—such as leaders, tippet, strike indicators, and the like — which if unused during one particular trip can always be useful during a future day on the water.

2. Get to know your host or lodge manager
A great alternative way to channel your pre-trip enthusiasm is to remain in contact with the lodge or guide you will be visiting. There are several things that, if communicated before your arrival, can turn a great trip into a truly unforgettable one. For example, if you have a particular piece of water that you would like to fish, let your host or lodge manager know in advance. Some special spots, such as the remarkable spring creeks in southwestern Montana, are privately owned and may require a reservation in advance as well as a rod fee. Don’t let the fishing opportunity of a lifetime fall by the wayside and discuss with your lodge your fishing options before you arrive!


By taking care of the details early, you’ll have less to worry about when you’re on the water.

3. Check-in with the lodge in advance to see what gear they can provide
We all love carrying our rod tube off a plane. It is a badge of honor signifying to the masses that you have arrived for more than just sightseeing. However, after many incidents of frantically dashing back onto planes to reclaim rods left in overhead compartments, I have learned a vital lesson. I now always opt to save my personal rods for local fisheries and instead use lodge or guide equipment when I can. Not only does this save the traveling angler from potentially being out several hundred dollars of lost gear, but also provides him or her opportunity to test run different rods. (Say, a Helios 2, for instance.) This is an easy way to minimize stress and focus on your strike indicator rather than your luggage.

4. You can’t over pack when it comes to layers
With all the space you now have in your suitcase from leaving gear at home, focus your packing on having the proper clothing for any weather incident. Here in Southwest Montana the sun may shine on Monday, snow on Tuesday, and rain on Wednesday. While the weather forecast can give you a pretty good idea of what you will need to bring, you will never regret having that extra base layer on a chilly Montana morning!


Make sure that you take the time to enjoy the non-fishing joys of your trip.

5. Have fun and make memories
When you’re traveling a long distance with the intention of catching fish, the occasional, but unavoidable slow day can be disheartening. However, there is lots revel in during a fly fishing vacation, whether it be the fizz of a local microbrew being cracked at the end the day, conversation with friends and fellow anglers, or the anticipation of a new day on the water. Don’t sweat the small stuff or small fish…enjoy every step of the way.

Kaitlin Groundwater is the Assistant Lodge Manager of 2015 Orvis-Endorsed Fly-Fishing Lodge of the Year Madison Valley Ranch, in Ennis, Montana.

Congratulations to the Winners of the 2015 Orvis-Endorsed Awards!

For more than twenty years, the Orvis Company has been recognizing excellence in sporting experiences through its Endorsed Lodges, Outfitters, and Guides Program (ELOG). Each. . .

For more than twenty years, the Orvis Company has been recognizing excellence in sporting experiences through its Endorsed Lodges, Outfitters, and Guides Program (ELOG). Each year representatives from each of these categories are nominated and ultimately one is chosen for the best of the year.

These awards are based on a number of criteria, the most important being the voice of the customer; the feedback we receive on these operations from the customers who have experienced them for that is the ultimate arbiter of success. Also taken into consideration are the operation’s environmental commitment to and stewardship of their resource, and their partnership with Orvis in providing the finest sporting experience possible for the Orvis customer.

The winners of this year’s awards were announced at a ceremony during the 2015 Orvis Guide Rendezvous in Missoula, Montana, on April 25. Click here to see the lists of nominees for each category.

Here are this year’s winners, with some entries accompanied by an exemplary customer review:

Orvis-Endorsed Guide Lifetime Achievement Award

George Hunker, Sweetwater Fishing Expeditions, Lander, Wyoming


Photo by Tom Rosenbauer

For the last three years, we have recognized the Orvis-Endorsed Guide Lifetime Achievement Award, and we are honored to carry this tradition forward and once again recognize the passion, dedication, and commitment displayed by one of the most influential guides to ever don waders.

George Hunker started Sweetwater Fishing Expeditions in 1977, along with his wife Paula, in Lander, Wyoming, and they have become the experts on fishing the backcountry the Wind River Range. Previously, he was one of the first National Outdoor Leadership School Instructors to work his way up to Associate Director. He is a former rancher and farmer, the father of three children (who he openly admits are smarter than he is), a lover of the outdoors, an addicted fly fisherman and fly tier from his youth in New Mexico.

He was named the Orvis Endorsed Fly Fishing Guide of the Year for 2003. He is known by his peers as a conservationist, philosopher and humorist. According to George, the goal of Sweetwater is simple: “To take people to beautiful places, where trout abound, and where simple camp life can cleanse our minds and bodies.”

2015 Endorsed Fly-Fishing Guide of the Year (West)

Chuck Page, of Big Hole LodgeWise River, Montana


Photo courtesy Big Hole Lodge

Chuck Page has been guiding on the Big Hole River and other Southwest Montana waters since 1983. He left Woodland, California at the age of 18 to guide in the Bob Marshall and Crazy Mountains of Montana. He became an outfitter, guiding fly-fishing trips and elk hunts, and his father joined him in 1984 to form an elk hunting business in the Pioneer Mountains above the Big Hole River.

Chuck began guiding fly fishing trips for Big Hole Lodge in 1989 and would often take clients on horseback into the high mountain lakes of the Pioneer mountains. His incredible work ethic, knowledge of the Big Hole River, and unmatched desire to “get his clients into fish” are renowned. Chuck seems to find a fly pattern that will work even when the fishing is slow. Chuck lives with his wife and daughter in Wise River, Montana, and is the head guide at Big Hole Lodge.

2015 Endorsed Fly-Fishing Guide of the Year (East)

Brown Hobsonbased in Asheville, North Carolina


Photo courtesy Brown Hobson

Brown Hobson runs Brown Trout Fly Fishing, in Asheville, North Carolina and was a member of 2014 Fly Fishing Team USA. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Natural Resources from the University of the South.

A native of South Carolina, Brown started fly fishing at age 15 in North Carolina, but he didn’t get serious about the sport until his college years in Tennessee. After making his way to Jackson, Wyoming, where he eventually become manager of the Jackson Hole Orvis store, he returned to his roots in the Great Smoky Mountains. His fly fishing experience combined with his Orvis customer-service background give Brown a skill set that allows him to provide exceptional days on the water.

2015 Endorsed Fly-Fishing Lodge of the Year

Madison Valley Ranch, Ennis, Montana


Photo courtesy Madison Valley Ranch

Madison Valley Ranch sits on the banks of a stretch of river known as “The Channels,” where wading anglers can wander and find a piece of water all to themselves. The lodge is also within striking distance of many other famous rivers, such as the Beaverhead, Big Hole, Ruby, and others.

Spectacular Big Sky Country views inspire, and the daily activity of local wildlife takes you back to a different time. You can escape from the hectic pace of everyday life and indulge in a luxury adventure where all the details are someone else’s worries and you are just warmly welcomed. One recent customer wrote:

“We’ve been visiting this lodge for many years now.  Everyone has been so warm and inviting since our first trip and everyone after.  They have truly become friends we look forward to seeing each visit. The fishing, the guides, the beauty of the valley, the cuisine, and the positive relaxed energy of the lodge all make this our most looked forward to trip of the year.”

2015 Endorsed Wingshooting Lodge of the Year

Greystone Castle, Mingus, Texas


Photo courtesy Greystone Castle

What’s both unique and compelling about the Greystone Castle (which also won this award in 2011) is that it offers so many things to the upland gunner: large fields of sorghum, millet, and switch grass bring memories of great gun dogs, flushing pheasants, bobwhite covey rises, and days in the field with friends.

The ownership and staff have been dedicated to creating one of the finest sporting experiences found anywhere in the world. Long-term habitat improvement and wildlife management has made Greystone an extraordinary hunting venue. This coupled with the unique castle facility and outstanding customer service makes Greystone Castle a destination without equal. This reviewer obviously agrees:

“I visited Greystone Castle as a first-time hunter within a mixed group of seasoned and novice hunters. The guides and dog handlers did an awesome job showing us the ropes, and they made it easy to fit right in. I was amazed at the quality of dogs and guides. The Lodge staff, wait staff, chefs etc. were fantastic. They were there when you needed them and invisible otherwise. The food was fantastic. Zero complaints other than we couldn’t stay longer”

2015 Endorsed Fly-Fishing Guide Service of the Year

Long Outfitting, Livingston, Montana


Photo by Carolyn Long

A recent Trout Bum of the Week, Matthew Long started guiding in Montana in the early 1990s and established his own outfitting operation in 1997. Since then, he has won this award three times. The small group of experienced guides accompanies clients on some of the most diverse trout fishing opportunities on the face of the planet—from float trips on the Yellowstone to wading trips in Yellowstone National Park, to battles with the wily trout of Paradise Valley’s famed spring creeks. Here’s an evaluation from one satisfied customer:

“Our guides were amazing!  They customized to our needs, and were very responsive with communications.  We even ran into another guide on the water that started asking ours for advice, which to our initial surprise he gave openly.  It my mind this speaks to the quality of his character. We definitely were with the right guides!”

2015 Endorsed Fly-Fishing Outfitter of the Year

North Park Anglers, Walden, Colorado


Photo courtesy North Park Anglers

Located in Walden, Colorado at the center of North Park’s diverse and exciting fishing opportunities, North Park Anglers takes pride in providing only the best equipment, flies, and advice from experienced guides who live and fish throughout the North Park region. Whether you are a first-time visitor to North Park, or have been fishing the area your entire life, their staff of friendly, knowledgeable guides can offer you indispensable tips and techniques for landing that trophy trout you’ve always dreamed about. This reviewer certainly felt that commitment:

“I’ve used guides and outfitter all over the world but none more professional, helpful and enthusiastic.  From advice on the water or in the shop, these guys go out of their way to make you feel like you’re the most important customer they have.  And did I mention their fly selection, holy @^%$!!!  It’s amazing.”

2015 Endorsed Fly-Fishing Expedition of the Year

Deep Canyon OutfittersBend, Oregon


Photo by Tom Rosenbauer

Deep Canyon Outfitter’s offers a fly fishing and adventure their clients won’t forget. The staff of Deep Canyon is passionate about sharing the best fly fishing experience with you. Their stated goal is to connecting you with nature, your family and friends, or with yourself. Whether it’s casting a Chubby Chernobyl during the famous Deschutes River stonefly hatch, fishing from a float tube on the beautiful Hosmer Lake, or swinging flies for summer steelhead, they cater each experience to meet your specific needs. This is the kind of review that led to this award:

“First class standards across all parts of the experience.  But most importantly, the entire crew was so welcoming that they took all the intimidation factor out of the trip for the beginners and our moderately experienced anglers. We could not have imagined a better trip”

2015 International Destination of the Year

Rio Manso Lodge, Argentina


Photo courtesy Rio Manso Lodge

This fishing lodge in Argentina boasts browns, rainbows, and brook trout in nearby waters. Unlike most of the Argentinean Patagonia Fly Fishing Lodges, which are located on vast Estancias surrounded by pampas, the Rio Manso Lodge is surrounded by forested National Park land. It is common to catch fish in the 2-4 pound range daily and there is reasonable chance you will catch a 5-10 pound trout during a week of fishing. The lodge itself is very comfortable with outstanding views from each room.

“Catching large, hard fighting fish was fun, but sitting around with other guests, the owner and guides each evening was very enjoyable.  The staff was incredibly accommodating. They asked me what I wanted to drink on the first night and every day I returned from fishing it was already sitting on the bar, not to mention they never let my glass run dry. The rooms were beautiful and the food was excellent.  This was a perfect lodge for us; I had high quality fishing while my wife enjoyed all of her treks and the horseback riding. We intend to return.”

Pro Tip: Where to Take Your First Flats-Fishing Trip


A Grand Bahama Islandbonefish.

My younger brother recently asked me where he should go for his first flats-fishing trip. He’s a longtime trout, bass, and striper fisherman, but he’s never tried the tropics. As far as I’m concerned, this one’s a no-brainer: go to. . .


A Grand Bahama Islandbonefish.

My younger brother recently asked me where he should go for his first flats-fishing trip. He’s a longtime trout, bass, and striper fisherman, but he’s never tried the tropics. As far as I’m concerned, this one’s a no-brainer: go to the Bahamas or Belize for bonefish. There are several reasons these destinations are the best place to start your saltwater angling career.

  1. Bahamians and Belizians speak English and are very accustomed to hosting Americans. This is not to suggest that other destinations in Central or South America aren’t as welcoming—most are—but if you’re on your very first International fly-fishing trip, it will help if there’s no communication gap between you and your guide. The Bahamas are only 50 miles off the coast of Florida, so traveling to the islands is extremely easy from the East Coast; Belize is a bit farther, but still an easy trip from most parts of the country. The less travel-related stress, the more you can focus on fishing.
  2. Bonefish should be your first saltwater flats fish. Casting for bones offers everything that makes saltwater angling so exciting. You’re casting to fish you can see, you have to make a pretty good presentation, you can watch the fish eat (or not), and once hooked they make reel-screaming runs. There are bigger species, such as tarpon, and more difficult species, such as permit, but bonefish are more forgiving for beginning anglers.
  3. Bonefish are plentiful and (usually) willing to eat. Unlike the well-educated bonefish in the Keys, Bahamian and Belizian bones are not nearly as finicky or wary. You won’t need to cast 90 feet to catch a bonefish, and if things get really tough, you can usually find schools of “mudding” fish that are eager to put a bend in your rod. If you’re starting on a long fascination with saltwater species, it’s good to start on a successful trip.
  4. Sight-fishing is a blast, and no other combination of species and destinations offer you so many shots at fish. While you’re chasing bones, you can also get shots at barracuda, permit, or even tarpon.
  5. Both places offer every kind of lodge, too. There are lots of bonefish lodges in the Bahamas and Belize, and they range wildly in amenities, location, and available water. Want to be close to civilization or way out in the boonies? Want to be surrounded by lots of other anglers or have a more intimate experience? Are you looking for huge numbers of fish or just really big ones? Do a little bit of research, and you can find an operation that fits your needs, your skill level, and your budget.

Given all this, don’t forget to do your homework to make sure you get exactly what you’re looking for. You can start your research at the Orvis Travel pages for The Bahamas and Belize.

Keep in mind that this article is about a first flats-fishing trip. There are dozens of other wonderful destinations that offer unique experiences, bigger fish, etc. From Christmas Island to Key West, there are challenges to keep any angler busy for a lifetime.