Video: Tying with Craft Fur, Part I

Many fly-tying recipes call for craft fur, which is sort of a generic term for synthetic fur. In this first part of a series on the material, Tim explains what craft fur really is and why the stuff from fly shops is superior to the products you . . .

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In Praise of the Royal Trude

Whenever I fish with Tom Rosenbauer, he makes fun of my love for classic fly patterns because he believes that modern tiers have improved on most of these old flies. When we were rigging up to fish a mountain brook . . .

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Video: How to Tie the Franke Shiner

Floyd Franke, who passed away in 2013, had a remarkable fly-fishing resume: he co-founded the Catskill Fly Tyers Guild, was a board member of the Catskill Fly Fishing Center and Museum, served five years as president of . . .

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Video: How to Tie the Freddy

Montana guide Tim Linehan–of Linehan Outfitting Company in northwestern Montana–love to fish the Freddy on waters big and small, and it has proven itself an exceptional terrestrial/attractor pattern. The Freddy (or . . .

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Video: How to Tie a Travis Para Ant

Tom Travis is a legendary guide and fly tier from Livingston, Montana, where he specializes in fishing the spring creeks of Paradise Valley and the rivers of Yellowstone National Park. As a guide, you want to use patterns that . . .

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Video: How to Tie the October Caddis Soft Hackle

The October caddis (genus Dicosmoecus) is one of the great fall hatches across much of the country. And after you’ve been tossing size 22 Blue-Winged Olives, Pheasant Tail Nymphs, and such, it’s always great to tie on a bigger fly. The trout feel the same . . .

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Video: Understanding Shanks

More and more streamer patterns are being tied using shanks, which allow for extended-body and articulated flies. Tim explains the differences among the three main types of shanks–Waddington, Intruder, and articulated. The . . .

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Video: How to Tie a Yellow Humpy

The Humpy is one of those classic patterns that’s been around so long that there are several different stories of its origin, but most credit tier Jack Horner, who created the attractor pattern in the early 1940s for the tumbling . . .

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