Video: How to Tie the EP Adams

For many anglers, the Adams is a “must-have” fly because it seems to imitate a broad spectrum of mayflies, making it productive in many angling situations. That pattern has been around since the early 1920s, so it has clearly passed the test of time. In . . .

Read More

Video: Fun with Craft Foam, Part 1

In this video, Tim explains the basics of tying with craft foam, from choosing which products to buy to various methods of cutting it into strips. Once you’ve got these strips down, you can use them to create a variety of buoyant patterns for all kinds of . . .

Read More

Video: How to Create a Brighter Floss Body

In this video, Tim explains why floss often looks darker on the hook shank than it does on the spool–especially if it’s tied on a black hook–and then demonstrates how you can overcome this problem. The key is to lay down a base of white before you . . .

Read More

Video: How to Tie the Timbit Nymph

Tim Flagler of Tightline Productions has developed a fascination with patterns that feature a drop bead, which causes a pattern to ride hook-point-up in the water. These flies may look strange, with their slightly misshapen heads, but they perform well . . .

Read More

Video: How to Tie a Drop-Bead Red Dart

Lance Egan is a well-known competition angler and fly tier from Utah. His well-known patterns include the Frenchie, the Rainbow Warrior, and the Red Dart. A couple years ago, Tim Flagler of Tightline Productions showed us how to tie . . .

Read More

Video: How to Tie a Flashback Pheasant-Tail Nymph

Tim Flagler of Tightline Productions loves himself a Pheasant Tail Nymph. Want proof? Over the years, he has taught us how to tie the American Pheasant Tail Nymph, a Beadhead Soft-Hackle Pheasant Tail Nymph, a Micro Pheasant Tail Nymph, a . . .

Read More

Video: How to Tie the Early Black Stonefly Nymph

In this week’s great fly-tying how-to video from Tim Flagler of Tightline Productions, he teaches you how to tie a simple, effective imitation of the early black stonefly nymph (genus Taeniopteryx). The key to this pattern is the way it mimics the wiggly . . .

Read More