Video: How to Tie a Catskills-Style March Brown Dry Fly


Catskills-style dry flies often have some bare shank behind the eye.

March browns (Stenonema vicarium) are among the more important hatches in the East and the Midwest. The big bugs don’t usually create blanket hatches, but instead emerge sporadically throughout the day, which means you can. . .

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Video: How to Tie the Picket Pin


This variation features a beard and leaves off the ostrich-herl collar

The Picket Pin was developed by Missoula, Montana-based fly tier (and saloon owner) Jack Boehme, whose career spanned the 1910s to the ’40s. He was pals and partners with Norman Means, who created the Bunyan Bug, of A River Runs Through It fame. The original Picket Pin featured a. . .

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Video: How to Tie the Same Thing Murray


This variation features a beard and leaves off the ostrich-herl collar

This great little fly was invented by Doug Hastings of Sydney, Nova Scotia. According to legend, the pattern’s name came from a simple on-stream conversation in 1993 with Hastings’s friend, Murray. They were on the. . .

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Video: How to Tie a Cream Cahill Sparkle Dun


This Sparkle Dun pattern is highly visible in low light and imitates both duns and spinners.

Late-season light Cahills (McCaffertium modestum)—traditionally called Cream Cahills—often hatch sporadically the last hour or two of light. The trout will rise to these duns, but they sometimes prefer the spinners, which return right at. . .

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Video: How to Tie the Foam Cricket


Late summer is terrestrial season, and crickets are in abundance.

It’s terrestrial time in much of the country, and having the right land-based bug can be the key to success. Last week, the folks at Tightline Productions showed us how to tie a Foam Beetle, and now they are back with a. . .

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Video: How to Tie the Beadhead Psycho Prince Nymph


The Psycho Prince can be tied in a variety of color combinations.

Since the brown trout we featured earlier today was taken on a Psycho Prince Nymph, I figured we oughta check the pattern out. Californian Mike Mercer is one of the more prolific fly tiers in the country, and he has an astounding 42 patterns listed with. . .

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Video: How to Tie the Green Caddis Larva


The green rock worm is a common net-spinning caddifly larva that trout love.
Photo by Tim Flagler

The Green Caddis Larva—also known as the Green Rock Worm—is an old stand-by nymph pattern, which is descended from the original Rock Worm created by Missoula, Montana barber Franz Pott in the 1920s. It’s an exceptionally effective nymph pattern that imitates many. . .

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Video: How to Tie the Beadhead Prince Nymph

In a recent poll of fly-fishing professionals asking them to identify their favorite searching nymphs, the Prince Nymph was one of the most popular choices. Although some argue that this style of nymph originated with Don and Dick Olson of Bemidji, Minnesota, it is named for Doug Prince, a California tier of the 1940s. This pattern works great as a . . .

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Video: How to Tie a Simple Foam Beetle

As the story (perhaps apocryphal) goes, someone once asked the British scientist J.B.S. Haldane what we could infer about the Creator from studying nature, and Haldane replied, “I’m not sure, but he has an inordinate fondness for beetles.” Haldan’s point was that beetles make up some 40% of known insects. And since trout eat insects, it’s only logical that trout share this inordinate fondness for such readily available sources of. . .

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