Video: How to Tie the RS2 Midge/Emerger

The RS2 pattern was developed more than 30 years ago by Colorado angler and tier Rim Chung. The name of the fly is short for “Rim’s Semblance 2,” and it fishes well as both a midge or a mayfly emerger. The original version featured natural beaver fur dubbing and saddle hackle for the wing. Many more modern versions, such as the one shown here, feature different. . .

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Video: How to Tie the Royal Wulff

In the 1930s, Lee Wulff was trying to create a dry fly that would stay afloat even in rough water, and the result was the original “Wulff” pattern, the White Wulff. According to fly-fishing historian Andrew Herd, Wulff had so much success with his new creation that he applied the same tying techniques to come up with the Grey Wulff and the Royal Wulff. However, some historians think Wulff is unfairly credited with inventing the. . .

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Video: How to Tie Al’s Rat

Continuing our string of midge patterns designed for clear, cold water, here’s another simple fly that has proven itself on the finicky trout of Pennsylvania’s spring creeks. Created by tier Al Miller, a lifelong angler who passed away in 2008, Al’s Rat is extremely simple and suggestive, as it has to be to fit on such tiny hooks. Miller was a fixture on his local waters and was known as a gentle and generous. . .

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Video: How to Tie the Pumpkin Head Midge

Last week, we featured a muted, imitative midge pattern, so I figured we’d with go with something a little more garish. this week. The Pumpkin Head Midge combines a dark body with a fluorescent-orange head—hardly mimicking the natural—to create something that’s both eye-catching and “buggy.” I know first-hand the power of fluorescent orange. When my friend Joe Phillips introduced me to. . .

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Video: How to Tie a Mercury Midge

Although most anglers think of midge hatches as winter phenomena, these tiny insects hatch year-round in most places. (In fact, some stillwater anglers focus on midges almost exclusively throughout the season.) However, winter anglers love midges best because Chironomids are often the only hatches that bring fish to the surface during the coldest months, and a Griffith’s Gnat cast to sipping. . .

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Video: How to Tie a Simple Scud

Scuds, crustaceans known as Amphipods, are on a trout’s menu year-round—especially in many tailwaters, spring creeks, and stillwaters. Trout love them because scuds are usually plentiful, easy to catch, and they have high nutritional value. There are almost 100 species of scuds in North America, but they all have the same basic shape, with prominent legs and a curved shell back. Mostly what. . .

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Video: How to Tie the Antron Egg

As Tim Flagler notes at the beginning of this video, some anglers think that egg patterns aren’t “proper” flies and are effectively bait. Of course, at other times, similar arguments have been made about beadhead nymphs, so don’t think there’s any kind of agreement on this subject. I can tell you that, when I was a fly-fishing guide on Alaska’s Copper River, egg flies were the only patterns the big rainbow trout would eat once. . .

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