Video: How to Tie JC’s Electric Caddis Pupa

Here’s a great video that walks you through a somewhat complicated pattern from well-known New Jersey tier, John Collins. About this fly, Collins says, “I created this pattern to imitate caddis larvae found in many rivers. After photographing numerous natural insects, I observed that their bodies had a very translucent nature to them, so to imitate them I. . .

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Video: How to Tie the Iris Caddis

The Iris Caddis is the creation of Craig Mathews, longtime owner of Blue Ribbon Fly Shop in West Yellowstone, Montana. The pattern imitates an emerging Hydropsyche caddisfly, which is the most important genus of caddisflies on the Madison and other waters of the region. With its Zelon shuck and wing and ratty-looking hare’s-ear thorax, the fly looks like a caddisfly struggling to escape its pupal shuck—a defenseless position that means. . .

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Video: How to Tie the Isonychia Spinner

Isonychia mayflies offer some of the best dry-fly activity from late summer through early fall, especially in the Midwest and the East. Although they don’t hatch in huge numbers, these bugs are big enough that trout can become quite excited. And when the mayflies that hatched sporadically throughout the day become concentrated during a. . .

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Video: How to Tie the Yellow Humpy

As Tom Rosenbauer points out in his chapter on the Humpy in The Orvis Guide to Essential American Flies, the Humpy is more of a style of dry fly than a single pattern. That said, however, most anglers think of the yellow version when they hear the name. Tom goes on to trace the lineage of the Humpy through a series of western deer-hair patterns, including the. . .

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Video: How to Tie the Forget-Me-Knot Midge

Unlike many trout-food insects, which are available to trout only during very specific times of year, midges hatch year-round on most waters. You know those times when you can see fish rising but you can’t find anything on the water? It’s probably midges or midge pupae that are on the menu. That means it’s time to tie on the 7X and a minuscule fly that you can barely see. There are lots of great midge patterns out. . .

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Video: How to Tie an Olive X-Caddis

Because caddisflies tend to emerge very quickly, trout don’t want to expend too much energy chasing them. Instead, the fish focus on those emergers that are crippled or are struggling to escape the nymphal shuck. The X-Caddis, developed by famed West Yellowstone guide and shop-owner Craig Mathews, imitates just such an insect, with a trailing shuck of Zelon and a splayed wing of. . .

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Video: How to Tie the CDC & Elk

As Tim Flagler, of Tightline Productions says at the beginning of this video lesson, “Form, function, and simplicity. What more could you want out of a fly pattern?” Hans Weilenmann’s CDC & Elk is an excellent caddisfly imitation that builds on the original Elk-Hair Caddis. (Al Troth, who designed the original EHC, died earlier this month.) Replacing the original. . .

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Video: How to Tie Al’s Trico

It’s Trico time in much of the country, and fishing these tiny bugs (genus: Tricorythodes) can be frustrating, especially when the fish get selective. The late Al Miller fished the Tricos on Pennsylvania’s Little Lehigh River for 45 years, so he knew a thing or two about what patterns work best. In the late 1990s, he developed a remarkably simple yet effective fly that lacks wings or tails. Miller said that he originally left these features off the fly because he couldn’t see well enough to. . .

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Video: How to Tie the Double Standard (Repost)

Two of the most effective–and most popular–trout flies in the world are the Pheasant Tail Nymph and the Hare’s Ear Nymph. So what could be better than a single nymph that combines the two? The Double Standard features the tails, abdomen, and wing case of a traditional PT and the buggy-looking hare’s-ear thorax. Put a gold bead up front, and you’ve got yourself a pattern that imitates many mayfly nymphs and has enough attractive features to work as. . .

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Video: How to Tie a Yellow Sally Stimulator

Yellow Sally Stimmie

Editor’s Note: We posted about the history of the Stimulator pattern last August, and it’s interesting enough to repost here:


Most folks think of Randall Kaufmann, famed West Coast angler and shop owner, as the inventor of the Stimulator, but the question seems up for debate. The fly’s true originator may be. . .

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