Tag Archives: william g tapply

“Bass-Bug Humbug,” by William G. Tapply

Written by: William G. Tapply


Bill Tapply had some awfully strong opinions about what makes a good bass bug.
Photo courtesy Vicki Stiefel

“It is with some degree of trepidation that I approach the subject of artificial flies [for bass],” wrote James A. Henshall in his Book of the Black Bass, “for I am afraid that I hold some very. . .

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“A Birthday Trout” by William G. Tapply

Written by: William G. Tapply


A young Bill Tapply shares an on-stream victory with his father, H.G. “Tap” Tapply.
Photo by Harold F. Blaisdell from Tap’s Tips: Practical Advice for All Outdoorsmen

The last time my father and I fished together was on his eighty-fifth birthday. What had been, for most of my life, a fishing partnership that took us all over the Northeast for everything that swam . . .

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“Gone Fishin’” by William G. Tapply

Written by: William G. Tapply


A young Bill Tapply shares an on-stream victory with his father, H.G. “Tap” Tapply.
Photo by Harold F. Blaisdell from Tap’s Tips: Practical Advice for All Outdoorsmen

We usually rumble across the iron bridge, turn off the road, follow the bumpy ruts beside the field, and park Dad’s station wagon at the water’s edge to offload the canoe. But on this gray afternoon . . .

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“Mad Naked Summer Night” by William G. Tapply

Written by: William G. Tapply


When the sun goes down on a trout stream, magical things can happen.
Photo by Phoebe Bean

It’s a little-known fact, and I hesitate to reveal it, but here goes: on the otherwise undistinguished little trout stream that passes under the bridge just a three-minute drive from my front door here. . .

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“Stuck,” by William G. Tapply

Written by: William G. Tapply


Bill Tapply casting to trout on a Western river.
Photo via williamgtapply.com

Fly fishing can be the best kind of therapy.

It was noontime on that pretty Wednesday in September, and I was sitting on the sofa watching television when Vicki came into the room and stood squarely in front of me. “For heaven’s. . .

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“Volkswagen Cove,” by William G. Tapply

Written by: William G. Tapply


A young Bill Tapply shares an on-stream victory with his father, H.G. “Tap” Tapply.
Photo by Harold F. Blaisdell from Tap’s Tips: Practical Advice for All Outdoorsmen

In the last month of my father’s life, when he knew his days were numbered, fishing memories comforted and sustained him. He’d had a good life, he said. No regrets. He’d been pretty . . .

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“Daisy-Chain Blues,” by William G. Tapply

Written by: William G. Tapply


Chasing saltwater species off the coast of Massachusetts was one of Bill Tapply’s passions.
Photo courtesy Vicki Stiefel

When my father was a young man living and working in New England, he caught striped bass and weakfish (seatrout) on his bamboo fly rod, casting from a dory into the harbors and estuaries . . .

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Pro Tips: Bill Tapply’s Pocket-Water Secrets, Part II—Gear and Flies

Written by: William G. Tapply


It pays to scot a pocket-water section before you fish it, to plan your approach.
Photo by Sandy Hays

Pocket-water rivers come in all sizes and shapes. Many classic trout streams alternate long, slow pools and rushing pocket water. Hallowed eastern rivers such as the Battenkill, the Beaverkill, . . .

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Pro Tips: Bill Tapply’s Pocket-Water Secrets, Part I


Pocket water isn’t as easy to fish as pools and glides, but it can be very productive.
Photo by Sandy Hays

Written by: William G. Tapply

Here the river surges over and around boulders the size of Volkswagens. The churning whitewater roars in your ears. It buckles your knees. It wants to knock you over. Around the bend, . . .

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“Same Time Next Year,” by William G. Tapply

Written by: William G. Tapply


Fishing the “Big Lake” for smallmouths was twice an annual tradition for Bill Tapply.
Photo courtesy Colin McKeown, of The New Fly Fisher 

It was shortly after the arrival of the new year—the snow drifts around the north side of my barn stood eight feet deep, and the red stuff in the thermometer outside my kitchen window was . . .

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