9 Tips for Living with a Big Dog in a Small Space

Living with a big dog often requires a few adjustments.
Photo by By Calicodaisy – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0

Dogs adapt well to unlikely situations—one reason they’ve put up with us for so long.  But all dogs, big and small, can present different challenges at home. Living with a big dog in a small space, while it can be difficult, is not only possible but also potentially rewarding for a dog and his humans. Here are nine tips to make…

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Which Dog Breeds Can Be Left Alone?


If you’re going to be out of the house a lot, make sure you choose a breed that’s comfortable alone.
Photo by Julie, Waupun
 

Dog breeds that can be left alone include Labrador Retrievers, Greater Swiss Mountain Dogs, and Corgis (Welsh and Pembroke varieties). These breeds tolerate being alone because their temperaments lean towards the laid-back side, provided they receive abundant exercise, play, and attention from their people during together time.

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Does Weather Affect Dog Behavior?

Yes. Weather—including rain and snow, temperature fluctuations, and changes in barometric pressure—can affect dog behavior. It’s similar to the effect weather can have on your own mood and energy. You’re likely peppier on sunny spring days, while on a cold, grey, rainy day you may feel more interested in a movie marathon on the couch. Read on to learn how changing weather conditions change your best friend.

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How to Create Productive Spaces for You and Your Dog, Part 2

Place training is simply teaching your dog to stay in a dedicated spot without being restrained in any way for an indefinite amount of time. The beauty of place training is that it builds right on top of the foundation laid with crate training. It also creates a . . .

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Pet Adoption Statistics: The Numbers Behind the Need

Each year millions of companion animals enter shelters. Hundreds of thousands are currently in need of homes. Here’s the good news: pet overpopulation has slowed dramatically since the 1970s, when it’s estimated American animal shelters euthanized between 12 and 20 million cats and dogs every year. Compare that to today, when only three to four million animals must be euthanized annually. And here’s another telling fact: in the 1970s there were 67 million pets in American homes, and today there are more than 135 million. In other words, we invite far more animals into our families these days and euthanize far fewer, perhaps suggesting a paradigm shift in how we think about animal stewardship.

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