Museum Piece: A Fine Piece of Wedding Cake


Fin-Nor’s “Wedding Cake” reel, designed by Gar Wood, was one of the first fly reels specifically
created to handle the rigors of catching large saltwater fish.
Photo by Sara Wilcox

The American Museum of Fly Fishing is located right next to the Orvis Flagship store in Manchester, Vermont. The folks from the museum will be sharing many of the. . .

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A Beginner’s Guide to Bamboo Fly Rods

Although the bamboo fly rod fell out of favor in the 1950s—as a result of an embargo against products from China, which limited the availability of the raw materials, and the introduction of. . .

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Museum Pieces: Anglers-in-Chief


President Eisenhower launches a cast on a mountain pond.
Photo courtesy AMFF

In honor of Presidents Day, we are featuring some of our most important fly-fishing Presidents. Because the Presidents took longer time off, sometimes up to three months, the opportunity. . .

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Videos: The Stories of the Adams and the Muddler Minnow

Our fly boxes are full of patterns–both famous and obscure–and each has a history. Someone, somewhere came up with the idea for the fly and then sat down and tied. Michigan fly-fishing legend Ray Schmidt has started a cool video series on classic . . .

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Video: Lefty Kreh, in His Own Words

Lefty Kreh needs no introduction, of course, but hearing him tell his own story in an unrehearsed fashion is simply fascinating. In this first part of Eric Stroup’s interview with Lefty, he describes. . .

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Photos: The Development of the Fly Reel in the 19th Century


The age of this reel is unknown, but it shows basic features we still use today.
all photos by Tim Bronson

In 15th century England, anglers didn’t use reels at all: They simply tied a braided horsehair line to the tip of a long rod. (Dapping and Tenkara operate on the same principle.) But by the 18th. . .

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Book Excerpt: Preserving the Heritage of Women Fly Fishers

Theodore Gordon’s fly fishing companion was often a woman, although due in part to the social mores of the time little is known about her. Margaret Penn, the daughter of William Penn, the founder of the Pennsylvania, was also an early flyfisher in the . . .

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