Chino vs Khaki, do you know the difference?

Written by: Orvis Staff

Chinos vs Khakis, do you know the differenceChinos vs Khakis, do you know the difference?
Chinos or khakis?
Photo via orvis.com

We’ve all heard both terms—“khakis” and “chinos”—used interchangeably to describe the same pants. But there are actually distinct characteristics that make each pant a style of its own—even if the differences are subtle. This of course made us wonder, do most folks know the difference between chino pants and khaki pants? And does it matter? Let’s see.

What Makes Chinos Different than Khakis?

With a more recent military uniform heritage, chino pants earned a more formal style than khakis. One of the distinct differences between the two, and an easy trick to use when shopping or pairing an outfit, is the stitching. Stitching on khakis is visible, whereas it is concealed on chinos. This gives chino pants a more finished look, which in turn makes them a little more “dressy.”

The second, less obvious and less reliable rule of thumb for telling the difference between the two, is the weight of the fabric. Chino pants are often made of a lightweight 100% cotton or cotton-blend fabric in a tighter weave, while khakis are often constructed of a heavyweight 100% cotton twill fabric. You probably wouldn’t wear your chinos to do yard work, whereas you might your khakis.

Third, chino pants are often cut slimmer with a closer fit than khakis, adding to their formal appeal. The fuller cut of khakis arguably makes them more comfortable and versatile.

Should I Choose Khakis or Chinos?

It depends. Beyond the basic differences between chinos and khakis there are a few other distinguishing traits that may help you decide which type of pants to choose for specific venues or occasions.

  1. Chinos come in a wider range of colors than khakis. Traditionally available only in a lighter shade of tan than khakis—closer to a cream color—these days chinos come in a variety of colors. This variety gives you more seasonal styling options.
  2. Khaki style pants have pronounced pockets; chino pockets are hidden. Concealed pockets add to the dressier demeanor of chinos.
  3. Chinos have flat fronts; khakis can be flat or pleated. This is purely a matter of personal preference, but in general, a pleated pant is more traditional. Pleats also help balance your proportions if you carry extra weight in your mid section, or if you are broad-shouldered. A flat front is a more modern pant silhouette that tends to flatter a slimmer body type.
  4. Both styles can be dressed up with a nice shirt and blazer. Both khakis and chinos are a better choice than jeans for dressier occasions. These days, many people wear either style to work.

A Brief History of Khakis and Chinos

Khakis were originally adopted as the military uniform of British officers in northern Colonial India in the mid-19th century. The word itself—khaki—comes from the Persian word for dust, used to describe the uniform’s drab color. Worn by various swashbuckling characters in famous Hollywood adventure movies, including the likes of Indiana Jones, khaki clothing has been memorialized through history and in popular culture.

Chinos originated in the military as well, during the Spanish-American war in the Philippines. The lightweight cotton twill uniforms produced in China were modeled after the earlier uniforms described above. And, as one might guess, the name chino comes from Spanish slang for “China.” But in an effort to conserve cloth, the pants were designed with tapered legs, and without pleats or pockets. The result was a more streamlined fit which has endured over time.

Fast forward to the present and it’s clear both styles of pants have been adopted as a sort of civilian uniform by the masses, a natty alternative to jeans. The bottom line is, whatever you want to call them or however you prefer to describe them, neither khaki pants nor chinos will ever go out of style.

Now that you know the differences, what do you prefer—chinos or khakis?

Shop Chinos and Khakis

 

20 thoughts on “Chino vs Khaki, do you know the difference?

  1. David Williams

    I like blue jeans. I can’t get used to those vertical pockets.I like the way jean pockets are designed.

    Reply
  2. Todd Z

    This post immediately caught my eye because, like you I had always thought the words were interchangeable, just a regional preference like sub, hoagie, hero, etc. to describe a type of sandwich. And thanks for the stitching clue. Now if I could only find lightweight 100% cotton Khakis … and what would they be called, Khakos? Chinkis?

    Reply
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    1. Kris

      I agree, in my country khaki is a color (something like light brown), and chino is a pant type.
      There’s some of pants types here, dress pant/ formal pant, chino, cargo, etc..
      when someone called a khaki pant, that’s a chino with khaki color.

      I’m not sure in another country.

      Reply
    2. Nitya

      Khaki is a Hindi word which is actually a material made from Indian cotton, it can also be referenced back to time of India’s freedom fight, when Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi made khaki from cotton to ban importing of goods from British empire. There are still many stored in India which make hand made khaki clothes.

      Reply
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  5. Elizabeth Stone

    Khaki is th COLOR … Chino is a material. Some pants are made of khaki colored chino material. Some pants are made of black colored chino material. Khakis became the name for khaki colored pants made of khaki colored chinos. Get it? Idiots?

    Reply
  6. G. Anthony

    Perhaps there was a time when khaki referred exclusively to a color (that is what I thought 40 years ago), but that time is long gone. Khakis refers to a style of pant that may or may not be khaki colored. Words can have more than one meaning

    Reply
  7. Zeke Heyselman

    From a very confident source: Khaki is a color. Chinos are a pair of pants. Know the difference but feel free to use the terms interchangeably.

    Reply
  8. Damion

    True. I’m a 70’s baby and have wore Khakis since I was knee high to a grass hopper.I just assume everyone knew that khakis were pants and wasn’t just a color.I just assume they had to be millennials but you learn something everyday.

    Reply
  9. David

    “Khaak” is a Persian word which means “soil”.
    It is adopted into English as a name for the color of soil, “khaki”.

    Reply

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